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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 12 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 6 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 6 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 4 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Theogony 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler). You can also browse the collection for Cythera (Greece) or search for Cythera (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 10, line 177 (search)
r the night wanes and dawn is at hand. The stars have gone forward, two-thirds of the night are already spent, and the third is alone left us." They then put on their armor. Brave Thrasymedes provided the son of Tydeus with a sword and a shield (for he had left his own at his ship) and on his head he set a helmet of bull's hide without either peak or crest; it is called a skull-cap and is a common headgear. Meriones found a bow and quiver for Odysseus, and on his head he set a leathern helmet that was lined with a strong plaiting of leathern thongs, while on the outside it was thickly studded with boar's teeth, well and skillfully set into it; next the head there was an inner lining of felt. This helmet had been stolen by Autolykos out of Eleon when he broke into the house of Amyntor son of Ormenus. He gave it to Amphidamas of Cythera to take to Scandea, and Amphidamas gave it as a guest-gift to Molos, who gave it to his son Meriones; and now it was set upon the head of Odysseus.
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 15, line 377 (search)
not a jot, but rescue the son of Klytios lest the Achaeans strip him of his armor now that he has fallen in the struggle [agôn]." He then aimed a spear at Ajax, and missed him, but he hit Lykophron a follower [therapôn] of Ajax, who came from Cythera, but was living with Ajax inasmuch as he had killed a man among the Cythereans. Hektor's spear struck him on the head below the ear, and he fell headlong from the ship's prow on to the ground with no life left in him. Ajax shook with rage and said to his brother, "Teucer, my good man, our trusty comrade the son of Mastor has fallen, he came to live with us from Cythera and whom we honored as much as our own parents. Hektor has just killed him; fetch your deadly arrows at once and the bow which Phoebus Apollo gave you." Teucer heard him and hastened towards him with his bow and quiver in his hands. Forthwith he showered his arrows on the Trojans, and hit Kleitos the son of Pisenor, comrade of Polydamas the noble son of Panthoos, with