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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 10 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 4 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Persians (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo 2 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 2 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 0 Browse Search
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Aristotle, Politics, Book 7, section 1328a (search)
A sign of this is that spirit is more roused against associates and friends than against strangers, when it thinks itself slighted. Therefore ArchilochusArchilochus of Paros (one of the earliest lyric poets, fl. 600 B.C., the inventor of the iambic meter, which he used for lampoons), fr. 61 Bergk, 676 Diehl, 67 Edmonds,Elegy and Iambus, 2. 133. for instance, when reproaching his friends, appropriately apostrophizes his spirit: For 'tis thy friends that make thee choke with rage. Moreover it is from this faculty that power to command and love of freedom are in all cases derived; for spirit is a commanding and indomitable element. But it is a mistake to describe the Guardians as cruel towards strangers; it is not right to be cruel towards anybody, and men of great-souled nature are not fierce except towards wrongdoers, and their anger is still fiercer against their companions if they think that these are wronging them, as