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Pausanias, Description of Greece 108 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 36 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Cistellaria, or The Casket (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 4 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Sicyon (Greece) or search for Sicyon (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1315b (search)
owards virtue, or at all events half-virtuous, and not base but only half-base.Nevertheless oligarchy and tyrannyOligarchy is not mentioned in what follows, and the context deals with the forms of monarchy. Tyranny is included among the constitutions at 1312a 40, but not elsewhere in this Book. Some editors bracket ll. 19-29 as spurious or out of place. are less lasting than any of the constitutional governments. For the longest-lived was the tyranny at Sicyon, that of the sonsi.e. descendants; Cleisthenes was his grandson. of Orthagoras and of Orthagoras himself, and this lasted a hundred years.From 670 B.C. The cause of this was that they treated their subjects moderately and in many matters were subservient to the laws, and Cleisthenes because he was a warlike man was not easily despised, and in most things they kept the lead of the people by looking after their interests. At all events it is said that Cleisthenes place
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1316a (search)
does not say whether it will undergo revolution or not, nor, if it will, what will be the cause of it, and into what sort of constitution it will change; and the reason for this is that he would not have found it easy to say, for it is irregular; since according to him tyranny ought to change into the first and best constitution, for so the process would be continuous and a circle, but as a matter of fact tyranny also changes into tyranny, as the constitution of SicyonSee 1315b 13 n. passed from the tyranny of Myron to that of Cleisthenes, and into oligarchy, as did that of AntileonUnknown, cf. 1304a 29 n. at Chalcis, and into democracy, as that of the family of GeloSee 1302b 33 n. at Syracuse, and into aristocracy, as that of CharilausSee 1271b 26 n. at Sparta [and as at Carthage].This clause seems an interpolation; cf. b 6. And constitutions change from oligarchy to tyranny, as did almost the gre