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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 32 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 26 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Phormio, or The Scheming Parasite (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 26 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 24 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 22 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Cistellaria, or The Casket (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Phormio (ed. Edward St. John Parry, Edward St. John Parry, M.A.) 16 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aeschines, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Lemnos (Greece) or search for Lemnos (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 72 (search)
and instead of respect and the hegemony of Hellas, Athens had a name that stank like a nest of Myonnesian*muonnh/sos, “Mouse-island”, was a little island off the coast of Thessaly, notorious as a nest of pirates. pirates. And Philip from his base in Macedonia was no longer contending with us for Amphipolis, but already for Lemnos, Imbros, and Scyros, our own possessions, while our citizens were abandoning the Chersonese, the undisputed property of Athens. And the special meetings of the assembly which you were forced to hold, in fear and tumult, were more in number than the regular meeti
Aeschines, On the Embassy, section 76 (search)
But I urged that we should take warning from the Sicilian expedition, which was sent out to help the people of Leontini, at a time when the enemy were already in our own territory and Deceleia was fortified against us; and that final act of folly, when, outmatched in the war, and offered terms of peace by the Lacedaemonians, with the agreement that we should hold not only Attica, but Lemnos, Imbros, and Scyros also, and retain the constitutional democracy, the people would have none of it, but chose to go on with a war that was beyond their powers. And Cleophon, the lyre-maker, whom many remembered as a slave in fetters, who had dishonourably and fraudulently got himself enrolled as a citizen, and had corrupted the people by distribution of money,Aristot. Const. Ath. 28 tells us that it was Cleophon who introduced the two obol donation from the treasury to provide a free seat in the theatre for every citizen who applied for it. This was the beginning of the Theorika, recognized in t