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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 32 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 26 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Phormio, or The Scheming Parasite (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 26 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 24 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 22 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Cistellaria, or The Casket (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Phormio (ed. Edward St. John Parry, Edward St. John Parry, M.A.) 16 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin). You can also browse the collection for Lemnos (Greece) or search for Lemnos (Greece) in all documents.

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Isocrates, Panegyricus (ed. George Norlin), section 115 (search)
And, furthermore, not even the present peace, nor yet that “autonomy” which is inscribed in the treatiesAbove all, the Treaty or Peace of Antalcidas, 387 B.C. Cf. Isoc. 4.120 ff. Xen. Hell. 5.1.31, quotes from this treaty: “King Artaxerxes thinks it just that the cities in Asia, and the islands of Clazomene and Cyprus, shall belong to him. He thinks it just also to leave all the other cities autonomous, both small and great—except Lemnos, Imbros, and Scyros, which are to belong to Athens, as they did originally. Should any parties refuse to accept this peace, I will make war upon them, along with those who are of the same mind, by land as well as by sea, with ships and with money” (Trans. by Grote, Hist. ix. p. 212). See General Introduction. p. xliii, and introduction to Panegyricus. but is not found in our governments, is preferable to the rule of Athens. For who would desire a condition of things where pirates command the seasIn the absence of the Athenian fleet. and