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Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 74 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 48 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 44 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 18 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 16 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 16 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 16 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Mercator, or The Merchant (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Politics. You can also browse the collection for Rhodes (Greece) or search for Rhodes (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1302b (search)
ear is the motive of faction with those who have inflicted wrong and are afraid of being punished, and also with those who are in danger of suffering a wrong and wish to act in time before the wrong is inflicted, as the notables at Rhodes banded togetherPerhaps in 390 B.C., cf. 1302b 32 f. and 1304b 27 ff. against the people because of the law-suits that were being brought against them. Contempt is a cause of faction and of actual attacks, upon the government, for vernment after the battle of Oenophyta,Against Athens, 456 B.C. and that of the Megarians was destroyed when they had been defeated owing to disorder and anarchy,See 1300a 18 n. and at Syracuse before the tyranny485 B.C. of Gelo, and at RhodesSee 1302b 23 n. the common people had fallen into contempt before the rising against them. Revolutions in the constitutions also take place on account of disproportionate growth; for just as the bodyIt is not clear whether what follows r
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1304b (search)
he demagogues; for they cause the owners of property to band together, partly by malicious prosecutions of individuals among them (for common fear brings together even the greatest enemies), and partly by setting on the common people against them as a class. And one may see this taking place in this manner in many instances. In Cos the democracy was overthrownDate unknown. when evil demagogues had arisen there, for the notables banded themselves together; and also in Rhodes,See 1302b 23 n. for the demagogues used to provide pay for public services, and also to hinder the payment of money owedi.e. owed for repairs to the ships, and perhaps also for advances of pay to the crews. to the naval captains, and these because of the lawsuits that were brought against them were forced to make common cause and overthrow the people. And also at HeracleaProbably the Pontic Heraclea (cf. 1305b 5, 36, 1306a 37), founded middle of the 6t