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Pausanias, Description of Greece 132 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 68 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 4 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 2 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Aristophanes, Lysistrata (ed. Jack Lindsay) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Messenia (Greece) or search for Messenia (Greece) in all documents.

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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
vered their mother and killed their stepmother Sidero. For knowing that their mother was ill-used by her, they attacked her, but before they could catch her she had taken refuge in the precinct of Hera.Compare Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 175, who seems to have copied Apollodorus. However, Pelias cut her down on the very altars, and ever after he continued to treat Hera with contumely. But afterwards the brothers fell out, and Neleus, being banished, came to Messene, and founded Pylus, and married Chloris,Compare Hom. Od. 11.281ff.; Paus. 4.2.5. daughter of Amphion, by whom he had a daughter, Pero, and sons, to wit, Taurus, Asterius, Pylaon, Deimachus, Eurybius, Epilaus, Phrasius, Eurymenes, Evagoras, Alastor, Nestor and Periclymenus, whom Poseidon granted the power of changing his shape. And when Hercules was ravaging Pylus, in the fight Periclymenus turned himself into a lion, a snake, and a bee, but was sla
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
e in Euboea, some in Peloponnese, and some even in Cyprus. Down to the second century of our era the descendants of the Dryopians maintained their national or tribal traditions and pride of birth at Asine, on the coast of Messenia (Paus. 1.32.6). And afterwards setting out from there, he fought as an ally of Aegimius, king of the Dorians.On the war which Herakles, in alliance with Aegimius, king of the Dorians, waged with the Lapiths, see Dio131ff. (Second Vatican Mythographer 159, 165). The situation of Oechalia, the city of Eurytus, was much debated. Homer seems to place it in Thessaly (Hom. Il. 2.730). But according to others it was in Euboea, or Arcadia, or Messenia. See Strab. 9.5.17; Paus. 4.2.2ff.; Scholiast on Ap. Rhod., Argon. i.87; Second Vatican Mythographer 165. Apollodorus apparently placed it in Euboea. See above, Apollod. 2.6.1ff. There was an ancient epic called The Cap
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
menus and the two sons of Aristodemus, Procles and Eurysthenes, threw stones; but Cresphontes, wishing to have Messene allotted to him, threw in a clod of earth. As the clod was dissolved in the water, it could not be but that the other two lots should turn up. The lot of Temenus having been drawn first, and that of the sons of Aristodemus second, Cresphontes got Messene.As to the drawing of the lots, and the stratagem by which Cresphontes secured Messenia for himself, see Polyaenus, Strateg. i.6; Paus. 4.3.4ff. Sophocles alludes to the stratagem (Soph. Aj. 1283ff., with the Scholiast on Soph. Aj. 1285). And on the altars on which they sacrificed they found signs lying: for they who got Argos by the lot found a toad; those who got Lacedaemon found a serpent; and those who got Messene found a fox.In the famous paintings by Polygnotus at Delphi, the painter depicted Menelaus, king of