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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 12: (search)
and lived handsomely in a substantial house surrounded by beautiful grounds. Though he was loyal to the tenets of the church, I discovered in conversation that his bank account was kept in England, and I jocularly remarked to him one day: Bishop, I expect some day to hear that you have renounced Mormonism and gone to England. He laughed quite heartily and replied: What makes you think so? I said: Because I understand the greater part of your fortune is deposited in the Bank of England, in London. He again laughed and replied, Don't you think that it is in a very safe place? thus avoiding a direct reply to my remark. Knowing General Logan's position, the friends of my father lost no time in paying me every respect, bringing me fruits and flowers, and in every way manifesting their great admiration for my husband. I could but admire the courage that had enabled these people with their teams and wagons to cross the great American desert and hew their way over the Rocky Mountains
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
thence to Paris, where we were joined by Mr. Pullman. From Paris we went to London. Hon. Robert T. Lincoln was our American minister to England, and it goes withhrough the lake region, enjoying every moment of the time. We then returned to London, and sailed for home, which we reached in July, 1890. In our nine months of stngered long to gaze upon the familiar picture. From Scotland we returned to London and across the English Channel to fascinating Paris. As it was midsummer, the we sailed for Brindisi, Italy. Thence, via Rome and the Riviera, to Paris and London, and from London home. My daughter, Mrs. Tucker, having remained in Saint PaulLondon home. My daughter, Mrs. Tucker, having remained in Saint Paul, I yielded to the importunities of friends to play chaperon to a party of young ladies. The Misses Koon, of Minneapolis, the Misses Dousman and Miss Paul, of Wiscom, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and to The Hague, Holland. From Holland we went to London, and finally reached home safely after an experience of nine months of consumin