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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 1 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910 6 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 3 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long). You can also browse the collection for Cambridge (United Kingdom) or search for Cambridge (United Kingdom) in all documents.

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Epictetus, Discourses (ed. George Long), book 1 (search)
Against the academics.See Lecture V., The New Academy, Levin's Lectures Introductory to the Phoilsophical Writings of Cicero, Cambridge, 1871. IF a man, said Epictetus, opposes evident truths, it is not easy to find arguments by which we shall make him change his opinion. But this does not arise either from the man's strength or the teacher's weakness; for when the man, though he has been confuted,a)paxqei/s. See the note in Schweig.'s edition. is hardened like a stone, how shall we then be able to deal with him by argument? Now there are two kinds of hardening, one of the understanding, the other of the sense of shame, when a man is resolved not to assent to what is manifest nor to desist from contradictions. Most of us are afraid of mortification of the body, and would contrive all means to avoid such a thing, but we care not about the soul's mortification. And indeed with regard to the soul, if a man be in such a state as not to apprehend anything, or understand at all, we think