hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 86 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 44 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 42 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 42 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 40 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 36 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 32 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 28 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 26 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 24 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). You can also browse the collection for Crete (Greece) or search for Crete (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 2, line 526 (search)
, in exile roams Through lonely plains or secret forest depths, Whets on opposing trunks his growing horn, And proves himself for battle, till his neck Is ribbed afresh with muscle: then returns, Defiant of the hind, and victor now Leads wheresoever he will his lowing bands: Thus Magnus, yielding to a stronger foe, Gave up Italia, and sought in flight Brundusium's sheltering battlements. Here of old Fled Cretan settlers when the dusky sail Theseus, on returning from his successful exploit in Crete, hoisted by mistake black sails instead of white, thus spreading false intelligence of disaster. Spread the false message of the hero dead; Here, where Hesperia, curving as a bow, Draws back her coast, a little tongue of land Shuts in with bending horns the sounding main. Yet insecure the spot, unsafe in storm, Were it not sheltered by an isle on which The Adriatic billows dash and fall, And tempests lose their strength: on either hand A craggy cliff opposing breaks the gale That beats upon
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 3, line 84 (search)
himself.' At this Metellus yielded from the path; And as the gates rolled backward, echoed loud Quoted by Dante and applied to the gates of Purgatory. 'Purg.,' ix., 129. The rock Tarpeian, and the temple's depths Gave up the treasure which for centuries No hand had touched: all that the Punic foe And Perses and Philippus conquered gave, And all the gold which Pyrrhus panic-struck Left when he fled: that gold,That is, the gold offered by Pyrrhus, and refused by Fabricius, which, after the final defeat of Pyrrhus, came into the possession of the victors. the price of Rome, Which yet Fabricius sold not, and the hoard Laid up by saving sires; the tribute sent By Asia's richest nations; and the wealth Which conquering Metellus brought from Crete, And Cato See Plutarch, 'Cato,' 34, 39. bore from distant Cyprus home; And last, the riches torn from captive kings And borne before Pompeius when he came In frequent triumph. Thus was robbed the shrine, And Caesar first brought poverty to Rome.
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 3, line 169 (search)
Greece, and to have reappeared in the Sicilian fountain. See the note in Grote's 'History of Greece,' Edition 1862, vol. ii., p. 8. Alpheus who in far Sicilian lands Beyond the billows seeks the day again: Arcadian Maenalus, and OEta loved By Hercules, and old Dodona's oaks Are left to silence; for the sacred train With all Epirus rushes to the war. Athens, deserted at the call to arms, Yet found three vessels in Apollo's port To prove her triumph o'er the Persian king. Next seek the battle Creta's hundred tribes Beloved of Jove and rivalling the east In skill to wing the arrow from the bow. The walls of Dardan Oricum, the woods Where Athamanians wander, and the banks Of swift Absyrtus foaming to the main Are left forsaken. Enchelaean tribes Whose king was Cadmus, and whose name records His transformation,As a serpent. e)/gxelus is the Greek word for serpent. join the host; and those Who till Penean fields and turn the share Above Iolcos in Thessalian lands. There first men steeled
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 7, line 214 (search)
them all, the first: While on the right, Domitius, ever stanch, Though fates be adverse, stood: in middle line The hardy soldiers from Cilician lands, In Scipio's care; their chief in Libyan days, To-day their comrade. By Enipeus' pools And by the rivulets, the mountain troops Of Cappadocia, and loose of rein Thy squadrons, Pontus: on the firmer ground Galatia's tetrarchs and the greater kings; And all the purple-robed, the slaves of Rome. Numidian hordes were there from Afric shores, There Creta's host and Ituraeans found Full space to wing their arrows; there the tribes From brave Iberia clashed their shields, and there Gaul stood arrayed against her ancient foe. Let all the nations be the victor's prize, None grace in future a triumphal car; This fight demands the slaughter of a world. Caesar that day to send his troops for spoil Had left his tent, when on the further hill Behold! his foe descending to the plain. The moment asked for by a thousand prayers Is come, which puts his
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 8, line 823 (search)
come For that no marble tomb about him stands Nor lofty monument. That little dust Time soon shall scatter and the tomb shall fall And all the proofs shall perish of his death. And happier days shall come when men shall gaze Upon the stone, nor yet believe the tale: And Egypt's fable, that she holds the grave Of great Pompeius, be believed no more Than Crete's which boasts the sepulchre of Jove.The legend that Jove was buried in Crete is also mentioned by Cicero: 'De Natura Deorum,' iii., 21. come For that no marble tomb about him stands Nor lofty monument. That little dust Time soon shall scatter and the tomb shall fall And all the proofs shall perish of his death. And happier days shall come when men shall gaze Upon the stone, nor yet believe the tale: And Egypt's fable, that she holds the grave Of great Pompeius, be believed no more Than Crete's which boasts the sepulchre of Jove.The legend that Jove was buried in Crete is also mentioned by Cicero: 'De Natura Deorum,' iii., 21.