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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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test oath. --The following is the test oath adopted by the city council of Montgomery, Ala. All citizens are required to take it: Be it further Resolved, That on the top of each page, above the signature, shall be inscribed the following:-- We, citizens of the city of Montgomery, Alabama, whose names appear signed below, do solemnly affirm, in the presence of God, that we will uphold, maintain, and support the Constitution of the Confederate States of America, and hereby pledge our lives and fortunes and most sacred honor in the defence of the rights of the citizens thereof. Resolved, further, That all our citizens be requested to call at the Clerk's office, and sign their names in said register.--Louisville Journal, Aug. 9.
and New World's ear, So that every man may hear And understand Freedom's utterance, bold and strong, Human right 'gainst human wrong, Right of Weakness to be strong-- Deathless right! And the tears are in my eyes, When I think you sympathize With my country, rent and torn By Dissension's cruel thorn; Bleeding fast, God alone can tell how fast, Possibly her best and last Patriot blood. O God! I bless, In this hour of our distress, Our confusion, loss and strain, Shuddering hopes and throbbing pain-- Thee I bless, that o'er the main Comes one honest human tone, Freedom's, Truth's, Religion's own, Us to cheer! Thus across the troubled water, I, America's sad daughter, From our fields of death and slaughter Stretch my hand Gratefully to you, John Bright! Honest champion of Right, Standing up in Heaven's pure light-- Up, on such a goodly height That both hemispheres may see How you look, John Bright! With God's sunshine on your head, Like a heavenly halo shed, From the empyrean height.
America shall rise Above the dismal cloud; This is her resurrection morn! She casts aside the shroud! Harp of Columbia! there is still A theme to waken thee; Thou canst again the bosom thrill As when, of old, from hill to hill Thy echoes roused the yeoman's will, And taught him to be free! Hast thou forgot the songs of yore Amid the scenes of peace? And shall thy music nevermore Awake the land from shore to shore, As when, from tyrant's hateful power, Our fathers sought release? Who calls America a land Degenerate and base? 'Tis false! 'tis false! that noble band Who sought their freedom, sword in hand, Shall see their sons forever stand A free, a loyal race. How base the heart that could forget The blood the fathers spilt! How heartless he who leaves his debt Of gratitude to go unmet, And he, how tenfold baser yet, Who glories in the guilt! Ah, yes! Columbia is true, Her sons are firm and brave; Let traitors come with fierce ado, We'll break their columns through and through, A
Prince Napoleon and the Union.--The Mining Register relates that while Prince Napoleon was at Copper Falls, in Lake Superior region, the following incident occurred: While returning from the stamp mill, the Prince proposed to drink (it being quite warm) from a spring by the wayside, and, taking an empty powder can used by the miners for the purpose, he drank--The land of Washington--one and inseparable. The compliment was handsomely returned by Mr. Burnham, in--France — the friend of America, which was received by the whole party with much enthusiasm.
Garibaldi.--The following letter from Garibaldi has been received by the United States Consul at Antwerp: Caprera, Sept. 10, 1861. my dear sir: I saw Mr. Sanford, and regret to be obliged to announce to you that I shall not be able to go to the United States at present. I do not doubt of the triamph of the cause of the Union, and that shortly. But if the war should unfortunately continue in your beautiful country, I shall overcome all obstacles which detain me, and hasten to the defence of a people who are dear to me. G. Garibaldi. To Mr. Quiggle, U. S. Consul at Antwerp. --N. Y. Tribune, Oct. 29.
Married.--On Tuesday morning, the 24th of September, at St. Paul's Church, in Lynchburg, Va., by the Rev. W. H. Herckle, General E. Kirby Smith, of the Confederate States army, to Cassie, daughter of Samuel M. Selden, deceased. General Smith, the gallant Kirby, has surrendered. The brave Blucher of Manassas, who marched boldly and unshrinkingly to the cannon's mouth, has at last thrown down his arms at the sting of an arrow. He was married in our city this morning to Miss Cassie Selden, daughter of Samuel Selden, deceased; and who that knows the sweet young bride can wonder at her conquest? Modest, retiring, gentle — in a word, womanly in the truest sense of the term — I know no one better qualified to win and wear the heart of a brave, good man. Long live the wedded pair, and may ruthless time ever preserve, in primeval freshness, both the orange wreath and the laurel!--Lynchburg Republica
The first of the new Confederate States postal stamps were issued on the 18th of October, and were eagerly bought up. The new stamp is green, with a lithographic likeness of President Davis within double oval border, surmounted with the inscription Confederate States of America. Outside of the circle, and at the head of the stamp, is the word postage, and at the lower edge its denomination, five cents. --Richmond Examiner, Oct. 19. The first of the new Confederate States postal stamps were issued on the 18th of October, and were eagerly bought up. The new stamp is green, with a lithographic likeness of President Davis within double oval border, surmounted with the inscription Confederate States of America. Outside of the circle, and at the head of the stamp, is the word postage, and at the lower edge its denomination, five cents. --Richmond Examiner, Oct. 19.
Shoddy stockings, said a third. Billy was silent; I saw his heart was breaking, and I said nothing. We held a council on them, and Billy, not feeling strong-hearted enough for the task, gave them to Cradle with directions to sew up the small holes. I came into the tent soon after, and he was drawing a portrait, with a piece of charcoal, on a board. That's a good portrait of Fremont, said I, he looks just like that; that's the way he parts his hair, in the middle. That isn't a portrait of Fremont, said Billy, it's a map of the United States; that line in the middle you thought was the upper part in his hair, is the Mississippi River. Oh!, said I. I saw him again before supper; he came to me, looking worse than ever, the stockings in his hand. Jimmy, said he, you know I gave them to Cradle and told him to sew up the small holes, and what do you think he's done? He's gone and sewed up the heads. It's a hard case, Jimmy, said I, in such a case tears are almost justifiable.
Members of the Charleston Convention killed in battle.--Major Gavitt, the United States officer killed in the fight at Fredericktown, Mo., was a Douglas delegate to the Charleston Convention from Indiana, and also attended the adjourned session in Baltimore. Lieutenant L. A. Nelms, of Georgia, (a Rebel officer,) reported as killed at the Santa Rosa fight, was a member of the Charleston Convention, and a most devoted Union man. When twenty-six of the Georgia delegates seceded from the Convention, he was one of the ten who refused to vacate their seats, but remained in the Convention till the close. On his return home Nelms was accused by one of his seceding colleagues with being untrue to the South on account of his remaining in the Squatter Sovereignty Convention. A duel was the consequence, in which Nelms was badly wounded in the arm with a bullet. When the Convention reassembled at Baltimore, Mr. Nelms, though still suffering from his wound, again appeared and remained till
55. ode to America. by Geo. H. Boker. No more of girls and wine, No more of pastoral joys, No after-sighing for some antique line Of bearded kings who, at their nation's birth, As children play with toys, Made merry with our earth: No more, no more of these! The girls are pale; The wine is drunken to the less; Still are the bleatings of the woolly fold; The olden kings look thin and cold, Like dim belated ghosts That hurrying sail Toward their dark graves, Along the brightening coasts, Chased by the golden lances hurled From the young sun above his cloudy world. My country, let me turn to thee, With love and pride that glow Pure as twin-altar fires that blow Their flames together to one Deity. Look where I may, O land beneath the iron sway Of the strong hand;-- O land gored through and through By thy own faithless brand; Land of once happy homes, To whose now darkened doors The hand of sorrow comes, Early and late, and pours, With no soft prelude, or no warning beat, Her urn of bit
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