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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 87 results in 15 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
witness and participator as an officer of the Confederate States Navy in these eventful actions, I shall attem States forces set on fire and scuttled, was the United States frigate Merrimac. She belonged to the new class honor of the plan—Lieutenant John M. Brooke, Confederate States Navy, and Constructor John L. Porter, ConfedeConfederate States Navy. The Editor would refer the reader to the dispassionate statement of Colonel Brooke, The Vnventive genius of Captain Archibald Fairfax, Confederate States Navy), and were the sole survivors of our disn that morning the Monitor, Naugatuck, and other United States vessels attacked our battery at Sewell's Point. imac drove the Monitor, Naugatuck, and six other United States war vessels from Sewell's Point to within one an old adversaries, the Monitor, Galena, and other United States vessels in their attack on Drury's Bluff May 15,ember 29, 1862, the Monitor, under convoy of the United States steamer Rhode Island, left Fort Monroe bound fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
Living Generals of the Confederate States Army. A compilation believed to be accurate up to date. One hundred and Sixty-six living Confederate Generals of different grades. Their names and rank. [From the Richmond Dispatch November 20, 1892.] The following list was republished by the Dispatch after revision by distinguished Confederate Generals including General Marcus J. Wright of the War Record Office, Washington, D. C. The Editor has further corrected it. Dallas, Texas. To the Editor of the Ex-Confederate. As your paper is read not only in this State, but, I hope, in every State in the South, where you have numerous readers, I send you for publication a corrected roster of the surviving generals of the Confederate army, compiled from the most reliable data to be had to October I, 1892. The number of general officers of all grades appointed and commissioned is four hundred and ninety-eight—viz.: Six generals, one general with temporary rank, one quarter-maste
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of Company D. First regiment Virginia Cavalry, C. S. A. (search)
m defeat, and later on the evening of the same day, at Trevillian's, held the key to our position until Fitz Lee could make his flank movement, which resulted in a victory over Sheridan and his cavalry corps. Twenty-four men of First Squadron, Companys D and K (Company K were from Maryland) at Mrs. Stewart's Tavern, Little River Turnpike, above Germantown, the morning after the second battle of Manassas, captured one captain, one lieutenant and fifty-four privates of the Fifth Regulars, U. S. A., a company commanded by General Fitz Lee before he resigned and joined his mother State. In the whole of the campaign, from the Rappahannock to the James, for about sixty days (for it lasted longer with the cavalry than with the infantry), we had no rest. The horses, half fed and moving day and night, were continually breaking down. As a consequence the company steadily went down in numbers, and on July 1st I reported one captain, one lieutenant, two sergeants, one corporal and ten men
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
Appomattox Courthouse. Account of the surrender of the Confederate States Army, April 9, 1865. By Colonel Herman H. Perry. Interesting and Hitherto unpublished particulars. [From the Atlanta, Georgia, Constitution November, 1892.] The story of General Lee's surrender must ever have a sad interest for those who admire the brave. While much has been written about that event, still there is lacking that inside information of the incidents which led up to it. A most interesting paper, read before the Confederate Veteran's Association, of Atlanta, spreads much light on the subject. It is from the pen of Colonel Herman H. Perry, now of Waynesboro, Georgia, who was assistant adjutant-general on the staff of General Sorrell. Colonel Perry was himself the officer who received from the hands of General Grant's messenger the written demand upon General Lee that he should surrender. The letter produced. The letter of Colonel Perry is addressed to Hon. Robert L. Rodge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
and Fall of the Confederacy, followed in 1884 by General Beauregard's Military Operations. Mrs. Davis' singular book, Jefferson Davis, ex-President of the Confederate States, was issued in 1890, after her husband's death. Johnston's book was almost wholly devoted to an explanation of his relations with the Confederate executilative rank of the officers of each grade shall be determined by their former commissions in the United States army, held anterior to the secession of these Confederate States. May 16 a supplementary act provided that the five brigadiers should have the rank and denomination of generals, instead of brigadier-general. Under the act of March 6 Cooper, Lee and J. E. Johnston had been appointed brigadiers in the Confederate States army. The act of May 16, without further action, made them generals, and it was so understood, as it appears that on July 20 Davis notified Johnston, in answer to an inquiry made while he was marching to reinforce Beauregard at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Medical history of the Confederate States Army and Navy (search)
The Medical history of the Confederate States Army and Navy Comprising the official report ohe survivors of the Medical Corps of the Confederate States Army and Navy, July 2, 1892, at N. B. Fo in several generations. He entered the Confederate States Army, modestly, as a private in the rankame, nativity, date of commission in the Confederate States Army and Navy, nature and length of servevery member of the Medical Corps of the Confederate States Army and Navy. Second. Obituary notitific labors of the Medical Corps of the Confederate States Army and Navy, and which shall vindicateGenerals6 Provisional Army: Generals2 Confederate States Army-Regular and Provisional: Lieutenanf duty as soldiers in the service of the Confederate States, that an artificial limb would be of no ur armies in the field were turned over to United States officers, to whom they surrendered, and aror the losses incurred by the individual Confederate States during the conflict of 1861-1865, at the[31 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
The Defence of Battery Wagner. An address delivered before the Confederate Sur-Vivors' Association in Augusta, Georgia, on the occasion of its Fourteenth annual reunion on memorial day, April 26th, 1892. By Hon. Lieutenant-Colonel H. D. D. Twiggs. Mr. President and Comrades My theme for this occasion is the defence of Battery Wagner, in Charleston harbor, South Carolina, against the combined attack of the land and naval forces of the United States, which occurred on the 18th of July, 1863. The defence of Charleston harbor and of Fort Sumter, which commanded the channel approach to that city, is familiar to the civilized world. The memories of that heroic struggle have been preserved by history, and embalmed in story and in song; and while incidental reference will be made to these defences during a long and memorable siege, my remarks will be confined chiefly to the military operations against Wagner on the 18th July. The almost unexampled magnitude of the war, involving
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
e all this as though you had approved General Sherman's course. Whatever policy Mr. Lincoln might have recommended to Congress for the restoration of the Confederate States to their relations with the Union, none knew better than you that he never would have undertaken to usurp the powers of Congress on the subject, much less tumption of hostilities. I have before me while I write the original of the following note from General Grant to General Stanton: headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., April 21, 1865. Hon. E. M. Slanon, Secretary of War: Sir—I have received and just completed reading the despatches brought by special memmense treasury, and placed the arms and munitions of war in the hands of Rebels at their respective capitals, which might be used as soon as the armies of the United States were disbanded, and used to conquer and subdue the loyal States. 4. By the restoration of Rebel authority in their respective States they would be enabled t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of William L. Saunders, Ll.D. (search)
say that he went in as a subaltern and came out with the glorious remnant of Lee's army the colonel of a decimated and war-scarred regiment, bearing upon his person terrible wounds, and enjoying the unqualified respect of his associates for duty faithfully and gallantly performed. In 1871, towards the close of the Reconstruction period during which he did as much to rescue the State from the ruin and degration which threatened her as any man within her borders, he was arrested by the United States authorities and carried to Washington to be examined by the Ku Klux committee, with the hope and expectation, on the part of those who caused his arrest, of extorting from him a confession of his own complicity in the acts of the Ku Klux, or at least procuring evidence against others. I can never forget his presence there, or the result of his examination. Although myself a member of the committee, he was my guest and shared my bed during his stay in Washington, but not one word passed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
f which were slaves. The non-seceding States had a population of 24,000,000. This gave the Union side about three to one of the aggregate population. The Confederate States had a seaboard from the Potomac to the mouth of the Rio Grande in Texas, and, having no navy, was exposed as much to naval attacks as those by land. They wargest force within the campaign had only been 40,000, was there as commander; not as a general of a particular army, but as generalissimo of the armies of the United States. General Grant, perhaps because he did not wish to follow in the footsteps of McClellan, adopted the overland route to Richmond by way of the Wilderness, Sp knowledge to divine the result. For the benefit of the future historian, we compile the following statistics issued by the Adjutant-General's Office of the United States July 15, 1885: Total enlistments in Union army2,778,304 Deducting Indians3,530 Deducting Negroes178,975182,505 ——— Total enlistment of white men2,595,79<
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