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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 13 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. By J. W. Mallet, ex-Lieut. Col. of Artillery and Superintendent of Confederate States Ordnance Laboratories. President Jefferson Davis bluntly stated the truth whenme clear to the authorities of the newly established Confederate States' government that an armed conflict was inevitable, treparation for it at the South. In the arsenals of the United States within Confederate limits there were 120,000 muskets (fated. At first, all arms and ordinance supplies of the United States were claimed by the several seceding States, in which t All of the massive machinery was constructed in the Confederate States, the largest parts, the heavy incorporating rollers 4 hold any military commission in the service of the Confederate States. Superintendent of Armories; T. L. Bayne, in charge dier General J. Gorgas, the Chief of Ordnance of the Confederate States, who well deserved to be held in honored and gratefu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
y kinsman, Capt. William Henry Murdaugh, who served both in the United States and Confederate States navies. No task you might have given Confederate States navies. No task you might have given me could have been more cheerfully done, but I regret that one better qualified than myself had not been assigned this work. Fortunate, Cap lieutenant of the Brazilian squadron; in, 1860 and 1861 on the United States frigate Sabine, and of his service on this ship I will quote frgh was in that fort I'd have aimed my gun to fire over it. The United States officer was on one of the opposing fleet. He missed the comms on the Northern Lakes. Of this plan Lieut. Minor, of the Confederate States navy, has this to say in a letter to Admiral Buchanan: ignificant the work assigned might have been; no officer in the United States or Confederate States navies was braver and his record is one tConfederate States navies was braver and his record is one that I believe his city and his State can feel justly proud of. I thank you for your attention.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Black Eagle Company. (search)
d near Petersburg, Va., April, 1865; Webb, Winfree, William, was on detail service during the war. In giving the roster of the Black Eagle Company, of Cumberland county, Va, I venture to say that the morale of that company could be taken as a fair representation of the Virginia troops. In its rank and file were soldiers who had been educated at the University of Virginia, the Virginia Military Institute, Princeton, New Jersey, and the very best medical institutions of learning in the United States. Along with these soldiers of culture and refinement came another class not so fortunate in the walks of life, but who had been educated to a certain standard in the common schools of our country. There were soldiers in this Company who represented as much negro and other property interests as could be found in the State. There were other soldiers in this company who never owned a negro nor property of any value. These two separate and distinct classes of soldiers, financially and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
etter, Ewell was crossing the Blue Ridge, more than two days march from Culpeper, and Longstreet in a direct line was thirty miles or more from Hill. Any disposition felt by Hooker to advance, does not seem to have been seconded by his corps commanders. General Sedgwick had given it as his opinion, that it was not safe to mass troops south of the river below Fredericksburg, and General Sykes expressed himself as opposed to any movement across the river with his forces at Banks' and United States Fords. Baffled and perplexed, and weighed down by his instructions from Washington, Hooker informed Halleck on the 13th, that he was about to transfer the operations of the army from the line of the Aquia to the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and as daylight dawned on the morning of the 14th, the last division of the Army of the Potomac could be seen filing over Staffords Heights on its way to Aquia. A. P. Hill had been instructed that when the enemy evacuated his position, he shoul
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
of Virginia, as any organization in the country. The battery is an historical organization of which the city of Portsmouth and her citizens may well be proud of, and its record is one filled with the glorious achievements through when Portsmouth came to be one of the makers of the history of our country and our State. The Portsmouth Light Artillery was organized in 1810, and under the command of Captain Arthur Emmerson, it achieved an enviable record in the war of 1812 between the United States and Great Britain. One of its principal engagements in that war was at the battle of Craney Island, in 1814, which is contributed materially to the repulse of the British. It continued in existence and was ordered into the service of the Confederacy on the 20th of April, 1861, under the command of Captain Carey F. Grimes, and on the night of April 20, 1861, was on duty with its guns parked at the intersection of High and Court streets, Portsmouth. During the Civil War, this command
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Story of battle of five Forks. (search)
Corps, is relieved from duty and will report at once for orders to LieutenantGen-eral Grant, commanding armies of the United States. By command of Major-General Sheridan. James W. Forsyth. Brevet Brigadier-General and Chief of Staff. Warrennd the officers and men paroled. This ended the career of the Army of Northern Virginia, and the downfall of the Confederate States quickly followed. There were paroled 28,231 officers and men. But of that number only about 11,000 bearing arms,on grave, overwhelmed by a tidal wave. With the surrender of The Army of Northern Virginia ended the life of The Confederate States, whose birth-throes shook a continent. The Confederate States died a—borning, and upon its in Memoriam, WConfederate States died a—borning, and upon its in Memoriam, With spirit pointing to heaven this inscription: No nation rose so white and fair, None fell so pure of crime, Will survive the effacements of time; and two figures will always stand out upon it in bold relief— Jefferson Davis and Robert E<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel James Gregory Hodges. (search)
ny attached to the Thirtieth regiment of the third requisition for the State of Virginia, commanded by Maj. Dempsey Veale, and mustered into the service of the United States on the 26th of April, 1813, at the camp near Fort Nelson, situated on what is known as the Naval Hospital Point. This regiment was engaged in the battle of CrLetcher had sent down Gen. William B. Taliaferro to take charge of the organized forces of this section when called into the service of the State. At noon the United States authorities closed the doors of the navy yard and began the destruction of its buildings, its ships and stores. It was an act of war and was so regarded by alnies in the yard as a guard he took the other companies of his regiment to the naval hospital grounds and there threw up breastworks for protection against any United States vessel that should attempt to re-enter the harbor. It was a Sunday morning. We all remember the work of throwing up the breastworks. It was done with a will—
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incident of the battle of Winchester, or Opequon. (search)
enant whose talents for war were more brilliant than those of Early. The records prove his achievements so clearly that they cannot either be rubbed out or diminised by the pretensions of rivals or the carpings of critics. Marylanders in the Confederate army. Messrs. Editors: How many Marylanders served in the Confederate Army is an inquiry that is periodically made. Maj.—Gen. Isaac R. Trimble, in a prepared address, delivered before the Society of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States in Maryland, on February 22, 1883, said: Gen. S. Cooper, Adjutant-General of our Government, told me in Richmond that over 21,000 Marylanders had entered the Southern armies. General Trimble was a man of unquestioned high character and integrity. It must be remembered that the Adjutant-General's office contained the records of all the Confederate armies, including the nativity of all soldiers. General Cooper was Adjutant-General of the United States Army before the war, and,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jefferson Davis. (search)
ment concerning the imputed special causes of his long imprisonment by the Government of the United States, and of his Tardy Release by due process of law. Contained in a letter from the Honourae, from recollecting conversations with Mr. Henry Wilson, Since the Vice-President of the United States. the previous April, while we were together at Hilton Head, South Carolina, that if Mr. Davimation. There I had placed in my posession the official archives of the Government of the Confederate States, which I read and considered, especially all those messages and other acts of the Executivs counsel for Mr. Clay. This has been since verified by the Hon. Andrew G. Curtin, lately United States Minister Plenipotentiary at St. Petersburg, upon information given to him by the literary exwas made a State prisoner. He had previously been publicly charged, by the President of the United States, with conspiring to assassinate President Lincoln, and $100,000 offered for his capture ther
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appendix. (search)
forwarded by the former mail had I then known your address. The letter will speak for itself, and I send you the original (with Mr. Greeley's cordial concurrence), so that, if you act upon the suggestion it contains, it may be in your power to make such public use of the letter as your own convenience and judgment may approve. Last summer I thought it would be prudent under certain assurances, which I have reason to believe would be given to us at Washington, for you to come into the United States, and I designed to go to Canada and confer with you on the subject; but just as I was about to go there I heard that you were leaving for Europe to return this spring. I thought it better to delay. I have frequently spoken to Republican gentlemen in the United States Senate and House of Representatives as to yourself, and find no ill — will against you personally; indeed, they generally have the same thought and wish, so well and manfully expressed by Mr. Greeley in the enclosed lett
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