hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition., Preface to the first edition (search)
Preface to the first edition Preface to the first edition I have formed the design of writing a History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent to the present time. As the moment arrives for publishing a portion of the work, I am impressed more strongly than ever with a sense of the grandeur and vastness of the subject; and am ready to charge myself with presumption for venturing on so bold an enterprise. I can find for myself no excuse but in the sincerity with which I have sought to collect truth from trust-worthy documents and testimony. I have desired to give to the work the interest of authenticity. I have applied, as I have proceeded, the principles of historical skepticism, and, not allowing myself to grow weary in comparing witnesses, or consulting codes of laws, I Have endeavored to impart originality to my narrative, by deriving it from writings and sources which were the contemporaries of the events that are described. Where dif
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition., Preface to the first edition (search)
Preface to the first edition I have formed the design of writing a History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent to the present time. As the moment arrives for publishing a portion of the work, I am impressed more strongly than ever with a sense of the grandeur and vastness of the subject; and am ready to charge myself with presumption for venturing on so bold an enterprise. I can find for myself no excuse but in the sincerity with which I have sought to collect truth from trust-worthy documents and testimony. I have desired to give to the work the interest of authenticity. I have applied, as I have proceeded, the principles of historical skepticism, and, not allowing myself to grow weary in comparing witnesses, or consulting codes of laws, I Have endeavored to impart originality to my narrative, by deriving it from writings and sources which were the contemporaries of the events that are described. Where different nations or different parties hav
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition., History of the United States (search)
History of the United States Introduction. the United States of America constitute an essential portion of a great political system, embracing all the civilized nations of the earth. At a period when the force of moral opinion is rapidly increasing, they have the precedence in the practice and the defence of the equal rightUnited States of America constitute an essential portion of a great political system, embracing all the civilized nations of the earth. At a period when the force of moral opinion is rapidly increasing, they have the precedence in the practice and the defence of the equal rights of man. The sovereignty of the people is here a conceded axiom, and the laws, established upon that basis, are cherished with faithful patriotism. While the nations of Europe aspire after change, our constitution engages the fond admiration of the people, by which it has been established. Prosperity follows the execution of evnce is diffused with unparalleled universality; a free press teems with the choicest productions of all nations and ages. There are more daily journals in the United States than in the world beside. A public document of general interest is, within a month, reproduced in at east a million of copies, and is brought within the reach
or perhaps even from the terrestrial paradise itself; and in the summer, Cabot, the youngest of them all, made known to the world the coast line of the present United States, as far as the entrance to the Chesapeake. The fame of Columbus was soon embalmed in the poetry of Tasso; De Gama is the hero of the national epic of Portugalf Europeans. In July, Verrazzani was once more in France. His own narrative of the voyage is the earliest original account, now extant, of the coast of the United States. He advanced the knowledge of the country; and he gave to France some claim to an extensive territory, on the pretext of discovery. Chalmers's Annals, 512.enobscot and the Kennebec became the allies of France, and were cherished as a barrier against danger from English encroachments. A French colony within the United States followed. under the auspices of De Guercheville and Mary of 1613 Medici; the rude intrenchments of St. Sauveur were Chap. I.} 1613. raised by De Saussaye o
Chapter 2: Spaniards in the United States. I have traced the progress of events, which, for a Chap. II.} season, gave to France the uncertain possession of Acadia and Canada. The same natioor eighty-five leagues, nearly a hundred miles, therefore, above the present boundary of the United States. His course was impeded by sand-bars; once, at least, it lay between rocky cliffs. His movto the Spaniards. I know not if a more bloody Indian fight ever occurred on the soil of the United States: the town was set on fire; and a witness of the scene, doubtless greatly exaggerating the lo Q. Rev. II. 216. De Thou, l. XLIV. It is, by more than forty years, the oldest town in the United States. Houses in it are yet standing, which are said to have been built many years before Virginied humanity by giving to the crime of Melendez an infamous notoriety. The first town in the United States sprung from the unrelenting bigotry of the Spanish king. We admire the rapid growth of our
Chapter 3: England takes possession of the United States. the attempts of the French to colonize Florideven years from this time, the first town in the United States' territory was permanently built. So rapid are rica, the western limits of the territory of the United States became known. Embarking on a voyage in quest ofaccompanied the expedition; and some part of the United States would have then been colonized, had not the unhadiscoveries, intending to visit the coast of the United States. But they had not proceeded towards the 1583 so offspring of English parents on the soil of the United States. The infant was named from the place of its biof England, who advanced the colonization of the United States; and his fame belongs to American history. No Eof the chief author of early colonization in the United States was reduced to beggary by the government of Englges which led the way to the colonization of the United States. The daring and skill of these earliest adventu
xtreme suffering from his wounds and the ingratitude of his employers were the fruits of his services. He received, for his sacrifices and his perilous exertions, not one foot of land, not the house he himself had built, not the field his own hands had planted, nor any reward but the applause of his conscience and the world. Smith, II. 102. Virginia's Verger in Purchas IV. 1815. He was the Father of Virginia, the true leader who first planted the Saxon race within the borders of the United States. His judgment had ever been clear in the midst of general Chap IV.} 1609 despondency. He united the highest spirit of adventure with consummate powers of action. His courage and self-possession accomplished what others esteemed desperate. Fruitful in expedients, he was prompt in execution. Though he had been harassed by the persecutions of malignant envy, he never revived the memory of the faults of his enemies. He was accustomed to lead, not to send his men to danger; would suff
be more known. But the danger for America did not end here. The traffic of Europeans in negro slaves was fully established before the colonization of the United States, and had existed a half century before the discovery of America. It was not long after the first conquests of the 1415. Portuguese in Barbary, that the pasAmerica, like the coasts of Africa, were visited by ships in search of laborers; and there was hardly a convenient harbor on the whole Atlantic frontier of the United States which was not entered by slavers. Compare Peter Martyr d'anghiera, d. VII. c. i. and II. in Hakluyt, v. 404, 405. 407. The native Indians themselves were law of nature, that, in a new country under the temperate zone, corn and cattle will be raised, rather than silk or wine. The first culture of cotton in the United States de- 1621 serves commemoration. This year the seeds were planted as an experiment; and their plentiful coming up was, at that early day, a subject of interest
success, and rising into powerful opulence, without the competition of a rival. It was the peculiar fortune of the United States, that they were severally colonized by men, in origin, religious faith, and purposes, as various as the climes which al records. Bacon, 1637. Chalmers, 211. Bozman, 299—318, and 324—9 McMahon, 145. In the early history of the United States, nothing is 1639. more remarkable than the uniform attachment of each colony to its franchises; and popular assemblithen springs, as broke from bonds, And rampant shakes his brinded mane. So it was with the freedom of religion in the United States. The clause for liberty in Maryland extended only to Christians, and was introduced by the proviso, that whatsoever true copy of the whole law is printed by Langford, 27—32. Compare Hammond's Leah and Rachel, 20, 21. No where in the United States is religious opinion now deemed a proper subject for penal enactments. The only fit punishment for error is refutati<
th degree of north latitude, and, in length, from the Atlantic to the Pacific; that is to say, nearly all the inhabited British possessions to the north of the United States, all New England, New York, half of New Jersey, very nearly all Pennsylvania, and the whole of the country to the west of these states, comprising, and, at the opportunities of extensive observation, equal in rank as in rights, and bound by no code, but that of religion or the public will. The eastern coast of the United States abounds in Chap VIII} beautiful and convenient harbors, in majestic bays and rivers. The first Virginia colony, sailing along the shores of North Carolina, wesieged cities, subdued provinces, or overthrown empires. In the eye of reason and of truth, a colony is a better offering than a victory; the citizens of the United States should rather cherish the memory of those who founded a state on the basis of democratic liberty; the fathers of the country; the men who, as they first trod t
1 2