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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15.. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15., Lafayette's visit to Medford. (search)
by the mayor of the city at the Roxbury line, and the procession had passed through the principal streets, he was received in the Senate chamber by the governor and his council. Many gentlemen were then introduced to him— officers of the United States, of the State and city; members of the Society of the Cincinnati, with their venerable and distinguished President, Hon. John Brooks, late Governor of the Commonwealth. La Fayette recognized his old military and personal friend, at the firstlame. He thought it an occasion worthy to be told to future generations, for thousands were assembled there. We all recall Washington's advice, In time of peace prepare for war, and considering the much-talked-of subject today—whether the United States shall or shall not maintain adequate military force in view of the awful conditions prevailing in Europe—it will not be amiss to quote the following concerning Lafayette's opinion on the subject as given at the time of his visit to the Charl<
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15., A Medford citizen from over sea. (search)
er, he put himself at the head of the troops and shared all their vicissitudes and desperate campaigns. Young Kakas fought all through the war and gained the rank of lieutenant. The struggle was carried on for two years and success was almost attained, but the intervention of Russia snatched the victory from the army, and Kossuth, betrayed by some of those whom he had trusted, was exiled to Turkey. Many of his followers were executed or imprisoned and others escaped to England and the United States. Mr. Kakas was one of those who escaped, first to England and then to this country. It has been a family tradition that he came over here with Kossuth. In 1851 Kossuth came to this country as the guest of the nation and was received with every honor. He made a tour of the country, going as far west as Cincinnati and south to New Orleans, arousing great enthusiasm everywhere by his bearing and addresses. Mr. Kakas came over in 1851, and in 1853 established himself in the fur busi