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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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, and who is charged with the duty of communicating "to the people of Virginia the causes which have impelled the people of South Carolina to withdraw from the United States and resume the power hitherto granted by them to the Government of the United States of America." I communicate, also, herewith the credentials of the HonUnited States of America." I communicate, also, herewith the credentials of the Hon. Fulton Anderson, a Commissioner duly appointed by the Governor of Mississippi, and charged with the duty of informing the people of this Commonwealth that the Legislature of the State of Mississippi has passed an act calling a Convention of the people of the State, to consider the present threatening relations of the Northern and Southern sections of the United States--aggravated by the recent election of a President upon principles of hostility to the States of the South--and to express the earnest hope of the State of Mississippi that Virginia will co-operate with her in the adoption of efficient measures for the common defence and safety of the South.
, and over the same, or any part thereof, shall be made upon the recommendation of a majority of the Senators representing at the time the non-slaveholding States. And in like manner, all appointments to office in the Territories which may lie South of said line of 36 degrees 30 minutes, shall be made upon the recommendation of a majority of the Senators representing at the time the slaveholding States. But nothing in this article shall be construed to restrain the President of the United States from removing for actual incompetency or misdemeanor in office, any person thus appointed, and appointing a temporary agent to be continued in office until the majority of Senators as aforesaid may present a new recommendation, or from filling any vacancy which may occur during the recess of the Senate, such appointment to continue ad interim. And to insure on the part of the Senators the selection of the most trustworthy agents, it is hereby directed that all the nett proceeds aris
The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1861., [Electronic resource], The condition of the Federal Treasury. (search)
The Secretary of the Treasury has sent to Congress a statement of the condition of the U. S. finances. The liabilities due and to fall due before the 4th of March next are as follows: For the State Department$116,868.57 For the Interior Department1,802,327.52 For the War Department1,521,131.00 For the Navy Department1,060,000.00 For the Post-Office Department700,000.00 Requisitions of War and Navy not complied with1,852,925.19 Treasury notes falling due before the 4th of March1,802,700.00 For the Treasury Department501,423.36 For the Light-house Board78,226.50 Fishing bounties due, estimated465,521.86 $9,901,118.00 The accruing revenues will, it is estimated, meet about $1,900,000 of the amount, leaving eight millions to be borrowed. There is in the Treasury, subject to the draft of the Treasurer of the United States, but little more than $500,000, and there are requisitions in the Treasury Department amounting to nearly two million of dollars unanswered.
Local Matters. Hastings Court, Thursday, Feb. 14th. --Present: Senior Alderman Sanxay and Messrs. Bray, Timberlake and Anderson. Martin Mueller, a native of Germany, took the requisite oaths and was admitted a citizen of the United States. In the case of Wm. Cavenagh, Thos. Devlin and Jas. McCorson, indicted for misdemeanors, the prosecution was abated as to Devlin, defendant, being dead. The other parties being put on trial and found guilty.--Cavenagh was fined $10 and McCorson $5, with costs, and ordered to 30 days imprisonment, and thereafter until said fine be paid. In the case of John Hagan, indicted for abusing officer Seal while in the discharge of his duty, a rule was awarded against J. Callahan, J. Wright, and Dr. Picot, his witnesses, for non- attendance. In the case of Henry Flowers, for misdemeanor, a rule was awarded against Michael Fleming, a recusant witness, returnable forthwith. Oliver Crosmore, indicted for misdemeanor, gave $200 bail
The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1861., [Electronic resource], The condition of the Federal Treasury. (search)
olis speech of Mr. Lincoln is everywhere understood as clearly indicating his purpose to enforce the execution of the United States laws throughout the boundaries of every State which has adopted an ordinance of secession from the Union; which, of cight to enforce its laws and protect its property, even if it becomes necessary to hang or shoot every traitor in the United States to do it. We want them to concede that it is the duty of this Government to retake from Southern traitors its stolen senals, etc. We want them to concede that Abraham Lincoln, having been constitutionally elected President of the United States of America, has a right to take his seat without any opposition from any quarter whatever; and that it armed opposition is coercing a State to enforce the national revenue laws? Will it be coercing South Carolina to take possession of the United States Custom-House, armory, and other property belonging to the Federal Government? Is it coercing a State to abolish Post
esident had been elected, and the war power, both offensive and defensive, was invested in the hands of the Government, to which South Carolina, of right belongs hence this State would take no step in the matter, except to prevent reinforcements, or repel sudden attack. It is now thought that our Government will send Envoys to Washington immediately, as it will to other foreign nations, demanding to be recognized as an independent nation; and also to treat with the Government of the United States for all forts, arsenals and public buildings situated within the territory of the Southern Republic, and then, if they are not all given up for a fair and honorable compensation, they must be, they will be, taken at all hazards. You will see that the Provisional Congress propose to admit all imports at a very low duty — at most, ten per cent, and possibly less — fare, if possible. This low duty, vs. your present high tariff, and the full expectation that your National Government wi
The Confederated Congress. Montgomery,Feb. 13.--Vice-President Stephens presented a model flag and the model of a device for the seal of the Confederacy. Referred. Mr. Brooks offered a resolution that the Committee, in selecting a flag and seal, be instructed to adopt and report a flag as similar as possible to the flag of the United States, making only such changes as may be necessary to distinguish easily one from the other, and adopt an arrangement by which the stripes shall number the States of the Confederacy. Mr. Brooks accompanied his resolution with some felicitous remarks, in the course of which, referring to the "Stars and Stripes," he said that flag is an idol of the heart, around which cluster memories of the past which time cannot efface or cause to grow dim. Mr. Miles opposed the resolution. He said he had regarded from his youth the Stars and Stripes as an emblem of oppression and tyranny. The debate grew interesting, and, at the suggestion of