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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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n lieu thereof: "With a view to the peaceable adjustment of these and kindred questions, the people of Virginia hereby express their earnest desire that the Federal authorities, if so empowered, shall recognize the independence of the Confederate States of the South, and make such treaties with them, and pass such laws, as separation (if unavoidable) shall render proper and expedient." The gentleman from Smy the (Mr. Sheffey) had moved to amend the amendment by striking out the words "if sed amendment was briefly debated by Messrs. Baylor and Wise, and rejected — yeas 24, nays 101. Mr. Early, of Franklin, moved to amend the 8th resolution, by striking out all, commencing with the word "several," (4th line,) and inserting "United States to resume the powers granted under the Federal Constitution, whensoever the same shall be perverted to their injury or oppression." The amendment was rejected by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Aston, Baldwin, Baylor, Berlin, Bo
which is in part, their power, shall be exercised for the purpose of subjugating the people of such States to the Federal authority. 3. That a committee of three delegates be appointed by this Convention to wait upon the President of the United States, present to him these resolutions and respectfully ask of him to communicate to this Convention the policy which the authorities of the Federal Government intend to pursue in regard to the Confederate States. Mr. Early, of Franklin, raiConfederate States. Mr. Early, of Franklin, raised a point of order: under the rule adopted, all resolutions touching Federal Relations must go to the Committee of Twenty-one. Mr. Flournoy moved to suspend the rule. The President decided that the resolutions were in order, the gentleman from Middlesex having indicated that one purpose of moving that the Committee rise was to afford the gentleman from Montgomery an opportunity of offering them. Mr. Preston urged the adoption of the resolutions, after which Mr. Early raised an
t point the troops will be concentrated.--Working detachments are busily employed in making up, according to military usage, hay, oats and strores of every description for embarkation. Companies C and F, Third regiment of infantry, have received orders to be ready at a moment's notice to embark; destination not stated. The first move will be on board the Powhatan, which is taking in war materials and large quantities of supplies for the subsistence of the troops. The Harriet Lane, (United States revenue cutter,) with a full complement of soldiers and marines, sailed from Quarantine yesterday morning, but returned to the city last evening. Rumor indicates that she will be sent to Fort Pickens. At ten o'clock last night, says the N. York World, our Army and Navy Reporter returned from a visit to all the forts at this station. There is not the slightest doubt that, to-morrow or Sunday, a large force of army soldiers will leave for some unknown destination.--The garrison of F
From the South. The Charleston papers say that with regard to Fort Sumter, "the end is approaching." The delay of the Administration is about to be concluded by the Confederate States. The Mercury, of Friday, says: "When it became generally known yesterday morning that the companies now on duty at Sullivan's Island had been ordered to fill up their ranks without delay, and that the reserves belonging to the several corps were to join their comrades already on duty by the four o'cloc orders, unless such an attack should be provoked by Major Anderson, or by an attempt on the part of his Government to bring aid to the beleagued fortress. Fourth. That these measures are taken at the instance of the Government of the Confederate States, which has lost all confidence in the professions of the Lincoln Administration. We have said that this information has no official sanction; but we have not given it without sifting thoroughly all the conflicting reports prevalent las
West1,622,948,262 South3,947,781,366 which gives for the North, per inhabitant, $246; for the West, $210; and for the South, per inhabitant, white and black, $415. but the great source of prosperity to a country are its export values; for these not only indicate a surplus production beyond the wants of a people, indicating affluence, but they furnish a basis of commerce and of finance, public and private, which bring social prosperity and political power. The exports of the United States in the fiscal year ending on the30th of Junelast, had risen to the enormous figure of $400,122,296, consisting in part of imported goods re-exported, and giving a net exportation of values produced in the Union, of about $380,000,000, deducting the specie of California from which would leave about $325,000,000 for the remaining staple exports of the country. now, it was the slaveholding States of the Union which furnished this whole exportation. Two-thirds of the value was made up
gainst the South, if by that expression is meant active hostility against it, England dare not and France would not. When we say Englanddarenot, we simply mean that her dependence upon cotton, which has always made her keep her peace with the United States, will make her keep that peace with the South; and when we say that Francewouldnot, we ascribe to that great and gallant people a magnanimity and sympathy with the South which we have never received from England. No one pretends that either power will take sides with the Confederate States, unless some collision between their cruisers and the United States blockading squadron should produce such a result, but, active allies of the North against the South,--never. If "setting their faces" against the South simply means the continuance of their anti-slavery sentiment, they may "set their faces" against that or any point of the compass they please, without protest or remonstrance; but "setting their faces" against their own trade and
alists in relation to the prospects of Charleston as a place of business. In doing so, I take it for granted that Virginia will not secede. The tariff of the United States is now a terrible drawback to that country. It is complained of by most Northern men of business, as well as by all Europe. No doubt it will be modified, tho direct taxation, without great retrenchment in public expenses, which no one expects from the party now and forever, to be dominant.--The Government of the Confederate States have laid a tariff far below the Old United States tariff, and their policy is, and ever will be, to keep far below that of the old Government. This they cUnited States tariff, and their policy is, and ever will be, to keep far below that of the old Government. This they can afford, because the expenses of our Government will be very small, the Government being administered on the most economical scale, having all the corruptions of the old Government as beacons to warn us of the danger. Already, as I have before stated, Northern merchants are seeking Southern homes, and making arrangements for
Resumption of specie payment in the Confederate States. --Mr. Memminger, Secretary of the Treasury of the Confederate States, has addressed a circular to each of the banks of the Confederacy, recommending the adoption of a resolution to redeem in specie such of their respective notes as may be paid in upon the authorized loan of the Confederacy. This measure, Mr. Memminger states, is necessary to prevent the inequalities and confusion which must else arise from the paying of subscription Confederate States, has addressed a circular to each of the banks of the Confederacy, recommending the adoption of a resolution to redeem in specie such of their respective notes as may be paid in upon the authorized loan of the Confederacy. This measure, Mr. Memminger states, is necessary to prevent the inequalities and confusion which must else arise from the paying of subscription in currencies of varying values.--He also urges the present as the most desirable time for a general resumption of specie payment.
[special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch.]Preparations' for War on the Confederate States.shipment of troops from New York New York,April 6. --The steamer Illinois has been chartered by the U. S. Government. The City of Baltimore will take her place, and carry out her mails. The chartered steamer Atlantic is taking in troops at the Fort in the harbor. All the forces are expected to be off for the South by the 10th inst. There is great excitement in this city, and everybody is talking about war. Allen. [Second Dispatch.] New York,April 6, P. M.--The Atlantic sailed at 7 P. M., with from 500 to 600 troops, one company of horse, and several cannon. The Powhatan sailed this afternoon, and the Illinois and Perry follow next. Col. Holmes, U. S. A., has resigned, and other resignations are talked of. A coolness between Seward and Lincoln is reported.
Failures and suspensions. BostonApril 5. --The Boston Commercial Bulletin's list of business changes in the United States gives thirteen failures and suspensions in New York; five in Boston; four in Philadelphia; seven in Baltimore; four in Cincinnati; two in St. Louis, and thirteen in other places. Total--forty-eight for the week.
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