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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 11, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 10 document sections:

Richmond as the Confederate Capital. --We understand there is considerable favor shown to our beautiful and advantageously situated city by the Provisional Congress, as the permanent Capital of our Southern Confederacy. We say advantageously situated, for if Washington was a suitable location for the Capital of the United States, we think that, as we cannot hold that city, the next best selection would be the Capital of Virginia, which has so many historical associations, and around which cluster so many National recollections. For beauty and centrality of situation, facility, convenience of access, polished society, and perfect healthfulness — summer and winter — surely no city in our fair Southern land can vie with Richmond. There is no lack of suitable sites for a National Capitol, and there is abundance of accommodation for the deputies in Congress, and visitors on business or pleasure. Washington had nothing to recommend it as the seat of government, except, perhaps, th
omery. There are an army of contractors now in Washington, anxious to serve the Govern ment in the way of furnishing supplies.--They are besieging the War and Navy Departments. There are some very fat contracts to be given out, amounting to several millions of dollars. Congressman Bouligny, of Louisiana, arrived here to-day from New Orleans. He states that four thousand soldiers have left that city for Lynchburg, Va., and that large bodies of troops from other parts of the Confederate States are moving in the same direction. He says that a strong Union settlement still exists in New Orleans, but is kept in complete subjection by the Secessionists. He traveled for some distance with Senator Johnson, who was groaned as a traitor at nearly every station. A fresh batch of army resignations were received to-day. Some of them are names of distinction. The following items are among the "latest from the South," in the New York papers: The Southerners do not w
More Rascality. --The New York Herald publishes a letter from Harrisburg, Pa., giving an account of an attempt in the Legislature of that State to confiscate certain real estate in Pennsylvania, owned by Hon. James M. Mason, of Virginia. The following proceedings of the Legislature appear at the close of the letter: "Mr. Ball read in his place an act relative to James M. Mason, now or lately a Senator of the United States. It alleges that Mr. Mason has been guilty of treason, in giving aid and comfort to rebels; that he, or his wife, is possessed of valuable property in Philadelphia, and authorizes the Speaker to appoint a committee to examine into the facts, and report to the Legislature hereafter; and until said committee shall make report, no conveyance of said property shall be acknowledged, and if the allegations shall prove true, said estate of James M. Mason and wife shall be forfeited to the Commonwealth."
From the Rio Grande --An Abolition Raid. Brownsville and Corpus Christi papers contain accounts of a boldly-attempted and timely-frustrated abolition raid on the Rio Grande, in Zapata county. It appears that about forty of the citizens (half-breeds) organized, armed and marched upon Carizo, the county seat of Zapata county, with the object of preventing the civil officers taking the oath of office prescribed by the Confederate States Constitution. After starting they were joined by a band of thirty more, all well armed and organized. This quite formidable force, after holding a council and pronouncing in favor of the United States Government, was proceeding upon Carizo when intelligence of the insurrection reached Col. Ford, at Laredo. Under orders from Col. Ford, Captain Nolan, with twenty-three men, advanced upon and attacked the insurgents — then numbering eighty men --at a point some eighteen miles from Carizo. and completely routed them, killing three and wounding s
e Georgetown College Cadets have disbanded. It is rumored that the College building will be used as a barracks by the Federal troops. As might have been expected, all the parties connected with the homicide of Cornelius Boyd, in Washington, have been released on bail. B. Fetzer, Esq., has been chosen Quartermaster, with the functions also of Commissary, for the Tenth Legion Minute Men. Hon. T. L. Clingman has gone to Montgomery as Commissioner from North Carolina to the Confederate States. Such, no doubt, is the sentiment of very many of the best men of Richmond, did they but speak out. It is said that Queen Victoria has sunk into settled melancholy since the death of her mother, and that it is feared she will not recover her mind. The number of hogsheads of tobacco inspected in Petersburg, Va., for April, amounted to 3,671, a falling off of 601 hhds. Field's building, next to Willard's Hote, in Washington, was totally destroyed by fire on Wednesday
The Daily Dispatch: may 11, 1861., [Electronic resource], Arrival of more Mississippi troops. (search)
The future. --The Baltimore Exchange holds that the strength of the South is amply sufficient to repel the attack of the North, especially since increased by the adherence of those large border States which have already manifested their intention to share the destinies of the new Confederacy, is not to be gainsaid. That the first decided victory, causing a retreat to the invading army, will at once rally to the aid of the South the remaining slave States, which now hold an apparently neutral position, is almost equally certain. This accomplished, the independence of the Confederate States will be considered achieved, and will be immediately recognized by the Powers of Europe. It peace be not then concluded, it will be speedily conquered.
South, as well as by our citizens generally: Office of the Grand Master of Knights Templar of the United States of America. Benjamin Brown French, Grand Master of Knights Templar of the United States of America: To all True andUnited States of America: To all True and Patriotic Templar:--Brotherly Love, Peace, Honor--An awful fratricidal conflict seems to be impending.--He alone who rules the destinies of Nations can prevent it. He works through human instruments. I implore every Templar Knight on the Continent f Va., Lynchburg, Va., April 27, 1861. Hon. B. B. French. Grand Master Grand Encampment. Knights Templar of the United States: M. E. Sir Knight: Your Circular of the 18th inst., relative to the "awful fratricidal conflict which seems to b State of Virginia, give you notice that that body is no longer under the jurisdiction of the Grand Encampment of the United States, and will no longer regard or obey any orders or edicts emanating from it or its officers. E. H. Gd.L, Grand Maste
Legislature--Lincoln's troops marching through Baltimore. Alexandria, May 10. --In the Maryland Legislature, on Thursday. Mr. Wallace submitted a report from the Committee on Federal Relations. It declares that the war waged by the United States upon the people of the Confederate States is unconstitutional, repugnant to civilization and sound policy, and subversive of our free institutions. A protest is entered against the war on the part of Maryland; she declares that she will takeConfederate States is unconstitutional, repugnant to civilization and sound policy, and subversive of our free institutions. A protest is entered against the war on the part of Maryland; she declares that she will take no part, directly or indirectly, in its prosecution, and the assertion is made that Maryland desires a peaceful and immediate recognition of the independence of the seceded States. The present military occupation of the State of Maryland is protested against as unconstitutional, oppressive and illegal; and the final resolution asserts that, under existing circumstances, it is inexpedient to call a sovereign Convention at this time, or to take measures for the immediate arming and organization
Peace messenger en route for Montgomery. A messenger from the Lincoln Government passed through this city, yesterday, en route for Montgomery. who, it is said, was empowered to negotiate a treaty of peace with the Government of the Confederate States. The Lynchburg Republican, which makes the foregoing announcement, would scarcely wish any such "messenger" any success in his undertaking. We place no faith in rumored overtures for peace from the Lincoln Government.
Kentucky Legislature. Frankfort, May 7. --The Legislature has adopted resolutions calling for the correspondence between Governor Magoffin and the Confederate States. Also. inquiring whether the Confederate States have made any requisition in Kentucky for troops, and the Governor's reply thereto. Also, to appoint a committee to inquire into the expediency of the suspension of specie payments by the banks. Kentucky Legislature. Frankfort, May 7. --The Legislature has adopted resolutions calling for the correspondence between Governor Magoffin and the Confederate States. Also. inquiring whether the Confederate States have made any requisition in Kentucky for troops, and the Governor's reply thereto. Also, to appoint a committee to inquire into the expediency of the suspension of specie payments by the banks.