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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 40 results in 11 document sections:

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rtion of their next crop in advance, and receive for the proceeds of its sale bonds of the Confederate States, running at twenty years, and bearing eight per cent. interest. As Agents of the ConfederConfederate States, you have made this call upon the Planters of our State to sustain the credit of the Government, and to provide means for the defence of our soil, our liberty, our families and our religionThe Second Independent Battalion of Georgia Volunteers were the first troops sent from the Confederate States into Virginia, to aid in her defence.--We are in a few miles of Fortress Monroe. We have ent of our Battalion gallantly repulsed an attack made upon the battery at that point by the United States ship "Star." Young men of Georgia fired the first gun and won the first victory in Virginia.name — while we are hearing the enemy's guns. But the President and Government of the Confederate States have come to Virginia. The Commander-in-Chief, Jefferson Davis, is in Richmond, to take c
A bearer of dispatches. --A letter from Bayard Taylor to the New York Tribuns says that Dr. Holland, who recently came bearer of dispatches to the Government of the Confederate States from England, returned thither on the City of Baltimore. He rushed aboard a few minutes before the seamer left New York. His dispatches were confided to a lady, who concealed them in her dress.
federate and State authorities in building munitions of war and such other structures as they may require, provided it can be done without loss to the company. Resolved, That the President be directed to receive at par the bonds of the Confederate States in payment for transportation of soldiers and persons in their employment, and munitions of war, from and after the 15th inst. Resolved, That the President be directed to pay no debt due from this company to any Government, or the citiided it can be done without loss to the company. Resolved, That the President be directed to receive at par the bonds of the Confederate States in payment for transportation of soldiers and persons in their employment, and munitions of war, from and after the 15th inst. Resolved, That the President be directed to pay no debt due from this company to any Government, or the citizens or corporations of any Government, at war with the Confederate States, during the existence of the war.
mparison of the financial resources of the United States and the Confederate States. Both the UUnited States and the Confederate States raise at present all their revenue by duties on imports. NConfederate States raise at present all their revenue by duties on imports. Neither have, as yet, resorted to direct taxation, and the revenue now received from the sale of publrepared from the official documents of the United States; The exprorts of the fiscal year endi this respect, of the Confederate over the United States. In this table, we have included all the whilst it would require on the part of the United States, a duty of over seventy per cent, to raise these facts. At present the bonds of the United States are selling in the New York it eighty-fiveok to the operations now going on in the Confederate States. Whilst our people have no large amountt in the bonds and Treasury notes of the Confederate States. Our bankers, by their action, exhibit s wasting away the means and credit of the United States, and it is impossible for them to keep it [2 more...]
emphis, in session now in Somerville, on Thursday last unanimously passed an Ordinance of Secession from the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of the United States. The other Presbyteries of the Confederate States will all secede preparatory to the organization of the General Assembly of the Confederate States. The firsce of Secession from the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of the United States. The other Presbyteries of the Confederate States will all secede preparatory to the organization of the General Assembly of the Confederate States. The first assembly of the Southern Church is invited to hold their meeting in this city. ce of Secession from the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of the United States. The other Presbyteries of the Confederate States will all secede preparatory to the organization of the General Assembly of the Confederate States. The first assembly of the Southern Church is invited to hold their meeting in this city.
e committee, with instructions to "enlarge their record." Mr. Holcombe reported an ordinance adopting, in the name of Virginia, the Constitution of the Confederate States. Mr. Bowyer submitted a minority report. Both were referred. The regular business of the day was the ordinance authorizing the Convention to advance abe apprehended and secured, or may compel to depart from this State, all suspicious subjects or citizens of any foreign State or power, at war with the Confederate States of America, or from which hostile designs against the Confederate States of America are apprehended by the President thereof; and the Governor may send for the peConfederate States of America are apprehended by the President thereof; and the Governor may send for the person or papers of any foreigner within this State, in order to obtain information to enable him to act in such cases. On motion, the Convention adjourned to 10 o'clock to-morrow. P. S.--We omitted, in our report of the proceedings at the Spotswood House, published in our issue of yesterday, to tender our acknowledgments t
n excellent taste, and in the spirit of a magnanimous, high toned soldier and gentleman: It is the pleasing duty of the Colonel commanding to thank the volunteer troops of Texas for the valuable services they have again rendered to the Confederate States. Being called upon at short notice to take the field, they responded with that promptness which proved how high is the military spirit of the State, and how ready her people are to seize up arms in defence of her honor, and in vindication of their rights. It was not the wish of the volunteers of Texas, however, to fight against those troops of the United States who had been defending their frontiers for years, and who found themselves on their soil in the attitude of enemies, only because of political changes which they did nothing to bring about — many of whom had been personally endeared to them by long association, and by their gallant deeds, (well remembered,) as their old comrades in the war with Mexico.--With the true
f Maryland "are culisted with their whole hearts on the side of reconciliation and peace." The people of these Confederate States, not withstanding their separation from their late sister, have not ceased to feel a deep solicitude in her welfareed with theirs, will seek to unite her fate and fortunes with those of this Confederacy. The Government of the Confederate States receive with respect the suggestion of the State of Maryland "that there should be a general cessation of hostilitiarnest desire is peace; that whilst the Government would readily entertain any proposition from the Government of the United States tending to a peaceful solution of the pending difficulties the recent attempts of this Government to enter into negotiations with that of the United States were attended with results which forbid any renewal of proposals from it to that Government. If any further assurance of the desire of this Government for peace were necessary, it would be sufficient to ob
eward's instructions to the Yankee Minister at Paris, Mr. Dayton, he always designates the Confederate States "insurgents," as if they were only a combination of disorderly individuals, resisting the n." What a falsehood! As the Mobile Register justly says: "The only intercourse which the Confederate States ever sought with the Government at Washington was to prevent war, not to make war." Seward of peace, and now declares that "civil war was an inevitable necessity to him." The seven Confederate States declared that they wished to live at peace with the States remaining in the Federal Union., peaceably or forcibly." In these passages he intimates to the French Government that the Confederate States have been endeavoring to bring the Federal Government to an "end;" that they have been try as many falsehoods in as many lines as Seward's letter of instruction to Dayton. The Confederate States, at that time, had no agent at the French Court to expose the falsehoods of Seward; but it
The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], Ordnance Department, Richmond.Va.,may 26, 1861. (search)
ble work, one thousand feet long, built by Engineer Litrobe but ten years since, in the most scientific manner. It had six spans, and was built at heavy outlay. The damage to property has not ended here, but the railroad company and the United States have suffered further losses of valuable works. The trestling on which the road was supported from the bridge to the end of the Government property, about half a mile in extent, is nearly all destroyed, as well as an upper bridge of 120 erstood that McMills has stated since his arrest that Walker had threatened to shoot Capt. Medlar. Information was received this evening that a coal schooner, which sailed heuce on Friday, and which ran ashore below, was set on fire by a United States vessel. Affairs in Alexandria. Alexandria, June 15. --Mr. Dickens, who has been a prisoner here for some days, having been arrested at his farm house, was released this afternoon, by order of the War Department, it having been as
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