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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 52 results in 8 document sections:

ough Conventions of their people, from the United States, re-assumed the attributes of sovereign po Government of their own, and that those Confederate States now constitute an independent nation de t they may present to the President of the United States the credentials which they bear, and the o or in any way admit, that the so-called Confederate States constitute a foreign power, with whom di hostile nations. The Government of the Confederate States had no hesitation in electing its choicenstitutional power in the President of the United States to levy war, without the consent of Congretes to recognize the independence of the Confederate States. They only asked audience to adjust, inrld, as a declaration of war against the Confederate States; for the President of the United States to the sword to reduce the people of the Confederate States to the will of the section or party whosundersigned, Commissioners of the Confederate States of America, having thus made answer to all th[32 more...]
, which Gov. Ellis will issue tomorrow morning, I hasten to forward it to you : [State of North Carolina.] A Proclamation by John W. Ellis, Governor of North Carolina. Whereas, by Proclamation of Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, followed by a requisition of Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, I am informed that the said Abraham Lincoln has made a call for 75,000 men, to be employed for the invasion of the peaceful homes of the South, and for the violent subversion of the liberties of a free people, constituting a large part of the whole population of the late United States : And, whereas, this high handed act of tyrannical outrage is not only in violation of all constitutional law. in utter disregard of every sentiment of humanity and Christian civilization, and conceived in a spirit of aggression unparalleled by any act of recorded history, but is a direct step to wards the subjugation of the whole South, and the conversion of a free Republic, inherited fro
er Expresses, to and from New York, Semi-Weekly. Freights delivered immediately upon the arrival of the ship. Heavy and Light Freights, Packages, money, Bonds, Legal Documents, &c., forwarded with safety and dispatch to all parts of the United States, Canada, and Europe. Notes, Drafts and Bills, with or without Goods, collected at all accessible points throughout the United States, and prompt returns guaranteed. Slaves forwarded by each of our Expresses, in charge of careful andDrafts and Bills, with or without Goods, collected at all accessible points throughout the United States, and prompt returns guaranteed. Slaves forwarded by each of our Expresses, in charge of careful and reliable messengers. Tobacco and other samples carried at unusually low rates. All freights promptly called for and delivered without extra charge For further information, please call at our office, 202 Main street. "Adams Express Company," W. H. Trego, Sup't. au 7--ts
Manufacture of United States arms. --Guns are being made at the United States Armory at Springfield (in consequence of a new order from Washington,) at the rate of 2,500 per month. This is more than three times as many as that establishment has been turning out. Whole cargoes of cannon balls are being transported from the Massachusetts foundries to different military stations out of New England.
Restricting Telegraphic operations. --The telegraph offices of New Orleans have in compliance with the request of the State authorities, declined to transmit any dispatches in cypher. It is stated also that no dispatches whatever, in reference to military operations in the Confederate States will be transmitted except by order of the proper authorities day
ril 18th, 1861. By last night's mall we received the latest, most cheering, and interesting news, regarding the present state of the country; among the rest, that "Virginia had seceded" and was no longer a part or portion of that Republican Union over which the Illinois Rail-splitter wields his maul. So soon as the glorious news was heralded to our citizens, preparations were made to fire thirteen salutes, as we are of the opinion that there are at least that number of the quondam United States who sympathize with, will soon, or have become members of the "Southern Confederacy." Every man was perfectly enthusiastic, and in less than an hour the firing commenced; it was loud and long, and hearty cheers stood from every point. Music swelled its strains, and many a martial air thrilled the car of those who are ready and willing to march and fight under the folds of the Palmetto flag. We have here two companies, one a Troop, the other Light Infantry, (Company A, 101st Regimen
livered to perhaps fifteen hundred persons assembled at the depot, by Col. R. R. Prentis, and Prof. Holmes, of the University, Hon. S. F. Leake, of Charlottesville, and Mr. Berry, of Alexandria. --When Mr. Leake said,"Fellow-citizens of the Confederate States of the South, " a shout went up such as never before was heard in this vicinity. Last night a Home Guard was formed in town, of sixty persons over 45 years of age--Col. Prentis elected Captain, A. P. Abell, Lieutenant. A fine militaryity. Last night a Home Guard was formed in town, of sixty persons over 45 years of age--Col. Prentis elected Captain, A. P. Abell, Lieutenant. A fine military corps was also formed at the University, of eighty students, who elected Professor Bledsoe Captain. Virginia is now where she ought to have been four months since — out of the Union. May God protect and bless the Common wealth of Virginia, and cause her speedily to unite with the Confederate States of the South. Monticello.
The Daily Dispatch: April 20, 1861., [Electronic resource], Exciting Scenes in Baltimore — passage of Northern troops. (search)
g three groans, began to call for Mr. S., and cheer him. It was finally understood by the crowd that he was not there, and the crowd fell off and dispersed. The police found it necessary during the night to arrest several parties for disorderly conduct, besides which there was no violation of the law. In front of Barnums the Southern Rights men were addressed by several speakers, and all was good order. Another account says: The troops included a company of the Fourth Artillery, U. S. A., Maj. Pemberton, from St. Paul, Minnesota; two companies from Pottsville, Pa.; one company from Reading, Pa., and the Logan Guard. The U. S. troops were acting as infantry, and carried only their side-arms. The volunteer companies were not more than half uniformed and armed, and presented some as hard-looking specimens of humanity as could be found anywhere. Some were mere boys, and there were a few colored individuals in the ranks, generally acting as servants to the officers. The Sun