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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 1, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 5 document sections:

re that a correspondents took place some time last month between Earl Russell and Mr. Adams, United States Minister, on the subject of alleged recruiting for the Yankee Government in Ireland Mr. A. d is New York also receiving large commissions for inducing them to emigrate. The artful United States Minister, with an appearance of great earnestness proceeds to He and his Government have be of the kind" Instructions to the same effect, he says, were given to all the Consuls of the United States. Mr. Adams admits that the liberal bounty paid by his Government for soldiers had occasfluence that the great corporations for the extension of railways in the western part of the United States having lost many of the laborers on their lines, by drafting for the army, were endeavoring ussell that "there is no doubt of the fact that there is a great scarcity of laborers in the United States," and he adds: "I learn from private sources that the rate of wages this season is very much
e so well as in the beginning of the war. Meagher, being unable to recruit his regiment, which had been nearly all slaughtered, resigned his office with evident dissatisfaction at the manner he and his men had been treated. But the best indication of the growing reluctance of foreigners to enter the Federal army is afforded by the proclamation which Lincoln has recently published, giving sixty-five days notice to all foreigners who have recorded their intention to become citizens of the United States that after that period they will be liable to military duty, and no plea of alienage will exempt them. We have before us the Irish American, of New York, which is very sarcastic upon this document. It is satisfied the paper is Lincoln's own — the whereases shew the country lawyer, etc.--concluding its remarks thus: "It is a two months notice in advance to foreign powers that we are about to kidnap certain persons who have not yet got rid of their responsibility to them, and that t
scenes. But even on the calculation of selfish interest, England has sorely mistaken her true policy, as she will one day see, in declining to unite with the wise and generous French Emperor in intervening to put an end to this quarrel. The United States would never have dared to resist the combined arms of the two, as is evident from the manner in which she has backed down at the slightest symptom of their displeasure. As it is, France, which offered to intervene, is still respected ihe wise and generous French Emperor in intervening to put an end to this quarrel. The United States would never have dared to resist the combined arms of the two, as is evident from the manner in which she has backed down at the slightest symptom of their displeasure. As it is, France, which offered to intervene, is still respected in both North and South, whilst England has made an implacable enemy of the United States, who will not be slow to seize the first opportunity of revenge.
The Daily Dispatch: June 1, 1863., [Electronic resource], Women and children sent from their Homes. (search)
not have natural protectors in the South were at the same time started for Camp Chase. This treatment is hereafter to be dealt out to all Southern sympathizers who may be found in their lines: Provost Marshal's office, Weston Western Virginia May 16, 1863. Madam: I have the honor to inform you that yourself and the grown members of your family are hereby required to hold yourselves in readiness to proceed outside the Federal lines on Tuesday morning, May 19th, 1863. the following regulations will be strictly observed: I. No person will be permitted to take with him or her more than sixty pounds of baggage. II. No person will be allowed to take with him or her more than $100 in United States funds, gold and silver included. No limit placed on Confederate scrip. III. Persons who cannot provide themselves with transportation will be furnished such by the Government. By order Brig.-Gen. B. S. Roberts. L. Markbrit, A. D. C. and Provost Marshal.
ands. A gentleman has been heavily fined for telling a child to stop singing the "Star Spangled Banner," and calling it a "nasty Yankee song." The programmes of the theatres of each night have to be submitted to the Provost Marshal, and it is ordered that all performances be "interspersed with appropriate national airs. " A general order of Gen. Banks declares that "any person who shall be convicted before the Commanding General of furnishing supplies to the enemies of the United States in arms shall suffer the penalty of death." Banks publishes an order, dated the 1st, at Opelousas, in which he announces his purpose to organize a "corps d'armee of colored troops," to consist of eighteen regiments of all arms — infantry, cavalry, and artillery, limited to five hundred men each. He quotes Thiers and Chambray as authority that the "valor of the soldier is rather acquired than natural."--Much depends upon the influence of the officers, and he proposes to detach for p