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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 38 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 22 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 17 1 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 8 0 Browse Search
Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for Leipzig (Saxony, Germany) or search for Leipzig (Saxony, Germany) in all documents.

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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
re of arms, or the organization of troops. The means of destruction are being perfected with a frightful progression; the congreve rockets, of which the Austrians have succeeded, it is said, in regulating the effect and the direction; the schrapnell shells, which launch floods of grape to the range of the ball; steam guns of Perkins, which vomit as many balls as a battalion, are going to centuple perhaps the chances of carnage, as if the hecatombs of the species of Eylau, of Borodino, of Leipzig, and of Waterloo, were not sufficient for desolating the European populations. If sovereigns do not unite in congress to proscribe those inventions of death and destruction, there will remain no other course to take than to compose the half of armies of cuirassed cavalry, to be able to capture with the greatest rapidity all the machines; and the infantry even will be compelled to retake its iron armour of the middle ages, without which a battalion could be struck down before approaching
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
e, or intrenched camp with tetes de ponts. Leipzig is incontestably a strategic point, because ioperations conducting to the objective point, Leipzig: the first was that of the army of Bohemia, lns of Erzgebirge by Dresden and Chemnitz upon Leipzig; the second was the line of operations of thefrom Breslau by Dresden or by Wittemberg upon Leipzig; finally, the third was the line of operation1806, if he had marched from Gera straight to Leipzig; and had there awaited the Prussian army retu his most natural line, the fine highway from Leipzig to Frankfort, besides the ten roads which leapened to Napoleon in the celebrated battle of Leipzig. The second is that interior lines ought notd to them the famous march of the Allies upon Leipzig, which succeeded by a contrary system. It Moreover, the campaign which followed that of Leipzig, soon came to demonstrate the correctness of Such was the famous project of marching upon Leipzig, without being disquieted about Dresden and t
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 4: grand tactics, and battles. (search)
orders of battle is neither chimerical nor useless. Indeed there is nothing even in the battles of Napoleon which does not prove this assertion, although they are less than all others susceptible of being figured by lines traced with the compass; we see, for example, that at Rivoli, Austerlitz, Ratisbon, he concentrated his forces upon the centre in order to watch the moment for falling upon that of the enemy. At the Pyramids he formed an oblique line in echelon squares; at Essling, at Leipsic, at Brienne, he presented a kind of convex order nearly like that in figure 7, at Wagram we see him adopt an order quite like that in figure 12, directing two masses upon his centre and his right, refusing his left, which he wished to repeat at Borodino, as well as at Waterloo before the arrival of the Prussians. At Eylau, although the encounter was almost unforeseen on account of the unlooked for offensive return of the Russian army, he outflanked the left almost perpendicularly, whilst u
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
ot less extraordinary, of the importance of good logistical measures was given at the battle of Leipzig. In receiving this battle, backed against a defile like that of Leipzig, and wooded prairies cLeipzig, and wooded prairies cut up by small streams and gardens, it would have been important to throw a great number of small bridges, to open roads for arriving at them, and to mark out those roads; that would not have preventg their left by Hoff and Gera, they were partially overwhelmed, and could yet be anticipated by Leipsic at Berlin. If they remained finally behind the Elbe, it was always in the direction of Gera anh all seeming strategic remonstrance had never succeeded in making act in concert, excepting at Leipsic and Brienne. It is known also that it was information given by Seslawin to General Doctoroffaccount. What is certain is that I was convinced upon the steeple of Gautsch, at the battle of Leipsic of the fruits which one may derive from such an observation; and the aid de camp of the Prince
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), chapter 7 (search)
to sustain them without delay, for a charge of this nature has but an instantaneous effect, of which it is necessary to profit briskly before the enemy drive back your cavalry disunited. The fine charge of the French upon Gosa, at the battle of Leipsic, 16th of October, is a great example of this kind. Those which they executed at Waterloo with the same object, were admirable, but without results, for want of support. In the same manner the audacious charge of the feeble cavalry of Ney upon er that all fields of battle and all countries do not offer the same advantages to artillery; in Italy, in Switzerland, in Vendee, in many parts of Germany, in every very broken country, in a word, we do not find fields of battle like Wagram and Leipsic. As for the rest, there are useful lessons in his pamphlet, to which no other reproach could be made than that of having drawn him from one extreme to the other. The author has without doubt wished to imitate those advocates who, after a fin