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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for Konigsberg in Bayern (Bavaria, Germany) or search for Konigsberg in Bayern (Bavaria, Germany) in all documents.

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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 1: the policy of war. (search)
ntervention under an elevated political point of view. With regard to the military point of view, it is plain that an army, appearing as a third party in a struggle already established, becomes preponderant. Its influence will be all the more decisive, in proportion as its geographical situation shall have importance relatively to the positions of the two armies already at war. Let us cite an example. In the winter of 1807, Napoleon crossed the Vistula, and ventured under the walls of Konigsberg, having Austria in his rear, and the whole mass of the Russian empire before him. If Austria had caused a hundred thousand men to debouch from Bohemia upon the Oder, it would have been finished, in all probability, with the omnipotence of Napoleon; his army would have been too fortunate in opening itself a way to regain the Rhine, and everything leads to the belief that it would not have succeeded. Austria preferred waiting to have its army increased to four hundred thousand men; it took
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
er, put their own fortresses at her disposition. Moreover, the number indicated expresses only that which appears necessary for a power presenting four fronts nearly equal in development. The Prussian monarchy, forming an immense front from Konigsberg to the gates of Metz, could not be fortified upon the same system as France, Spain or Austria. Thus the geographical dispositions, or the extreme extent of certain States, may cause this number to be diminished or augmented, especially when th the maritime combinations of war, or for magazines; they may become disastrous for a continental army, in offering to it the deceitful prospect of a support. Benningsen came near compromising the Russian armies in basing himself in 1807, upon Konigsberg, because of the facility which that city gave for supplying himself. If the Russian army, instead of concentrating, in 1812, upon Smolensk, had chosen to support itself upon Dunabourg and Riga, it would have run the risk of being thrown back u