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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for Weimar (Thuringia, Germany) or search for Weimar (Thuringia, Germany) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
of the Appenines, he had, in case of reverse, all the means of regaining the Var or the Valais. In the same manner in the campaign of 1806, if he had marched from Gera straight to Leipzig; and had there awaited the Prussian army returning from Weimar, he would have been cut off from his base of the Rhine, as well as the Duke of Brunswick from that of the Elbe; whereas by moving from Gera to the west in the direction of Weimar, he placed his front of operations in advance of the three routes oWeimar, he placed his front of operations in advance of the three routes of Saalfield, Schleiz and Hof, which served him as lines of communication, and which he covered thus perfectly. And even if the Prussians had imagined they could cut him off from his lines of retreat by throwing themselves between Gera and Bareith, then they would have opened to him his most natural line, the fine highway from Leipzig to Frankfort, besides the ten roads which lead from Saxony through Cassel to Coblentz, Cologne, and even Wesel. Here is enough to prove the importance of those ki
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
nemy's general, and be able to wrest from him the secret of his enterprises; he will limit himself oftener to indicating the movements of which he is a witness, or those which he shall learn through public rumor, and when one shall receive the information of those movements, he will know nothing of those which supervene in the interval, nor of the ulterior end which the enemy proposes to himself; he will know well, for example, that such a corps has passed through Jena, directing itself upon Weimar — such another has passed through Gera, directing itself towards Naumburg; but where will they go? What do they wish to undertake? This is what will be very difficult to learn even from the most skillful spy. When armies encamped in tents, almost wholly united, then news of the enemy was more certain, for parties could be pushed even within sight of their camp, and spies could become instructed of all the movements of those camps. But with the present organization into army corps, whic