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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 368 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 116 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 82 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 44 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 40 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 40 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 21 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Montreal (Canada) or search for Montreal (Canada) in all documents.

Your search returned 184 results in 116 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Ethan, 1737- (search)
f the New York authorities. The latter declared Allen an outlaw. and offered a reward of £ 150 for his arrest. He defied his enemies, and persisted in his course. Early in May, 1775, he led a few men and took the fortress of Ticonderoga. His followers were called Green Mountain boys. His success as a partisan caused him to be sent twice into Canada, during the latter half of 1775, to win the people over to the republican cause. In the last of these expeditions he attempted to capture Montreal. With less than 100 recruits, mostly Canadians, Colonel Allen crossed the St. Lawrence, Sept. 25, 1775. This was (lone at the suggestion of Col. John Brown, who was also recruiting in the vicinity, and who agreed to cross the river at the same time a little above the city, the attack to be made simultaneously by both parties. For causes never satisfactorily explained, Brown did not cross, and disaster ensued. Gen. Robert Prescott was in command in the city. He sallied out with a con
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Amherst, Sir Jeffrey, 1717- (search)
1717; became an ensign in the army in 1731, and was aide to Lord Ligonier and the Duke of Cumberland. In 1756 he was promoted to major-general and given the command of the expedition against Louisburg in Sir Jeffrey Amherst. 1758, which resulted in its capture, with other French strongholds in that vicinity. In September, that year, he was appointed commander-in-chief in America, and led the troops in person, in 1759, that drove the French from Lake Champlain. The next year he captured Montreal and completed the conquest of Canada. For these acts he was rewarded with the thanks of Parliament and the Order of the Bath. In 1763 he was appointed governor of Virginia. The atrocities of the Indians in May and June of that year aroused the anger and the energies of Sir Jeffrey, and he contemplated hurling swift destruction upon the barbarians. He denounced Pontiac as the chief ringleader of mischief ; and, in a proclamation, said, Whoever kills Pontiac shall receive from me a reward
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anne, Queen, (search)
bout 7,000 men, departed for the St. Lawrence. Meanwhile. Nicholson had proceeded to Albany, where a force of about 4,000) men were gathered, a portion of them Iroquois Indians. These forces commenced their march towards Canada Aug. 28. Walker, like Braddock nearly fifty years later. haughtily refused to listen to experienced subordinates, and lost eight ships and about 1,000 men on the rocks at the mouth of the St. Lawrence on the night of Sept. 2. Disheartened by this calamity, Walker returned to England with the remainder of the fleet. and the colonial troops went back to Boston. On hearing of this failure, the land force marching to attack Montreal retraced their steps. Hostilities were now suspended, and peace was, concluded by the treaty of Utrecht, April 11, 1713. The eastern Indians sued for peace. and at Portsmouth the governors of Massachusetts and New Hampshire made a covenant of peace July 24) with the chiefs of the hostile tribes. A peace of thirty years ensued.
between these two commanders that the public service was greatly injured thereby. The Secretary of War (Armstrong) was preparing to invade Canada by way of the St. Lawrence, and, fearing the effects of this enmity, transferred the headquarters of the War Department to Sackett's Harbor, at the east end of Lake Ontario, that he might promote harmony between these testy old generals. In arranging for the expedition down the St. Lawrence, Armstrong directed Hampton to penetrate Canada towards Montreal by way of the Sorel River. Instead of obeying the order, Hampton marched his troops to the Chateaugay River, and at Chateaugay Four Corners he tarried twenty-six days awaiting orders. Finally he was ordered to descend the Chateaugay and meet Wilkinson at its mouth. He moved forward late in October, when he was confronted by Lieutenant-Colonel De Salaberry, near the junction of Outard Creek and the Chateaugay, where Hampton encamped and was overtaken by his artillery. De Salaberry was e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Averill, William woods, 1832- (search)
arranged in a line extending from Staunton to Newport to intercept the raider. He dashed through this line at Covington in the face of some opposition, destroyed the bridges behind him, and one of his regiments, which had been cut off from the rest, swam the stream and joined the others, with the loss of four men drowned. Averill captured during the raid about 200 men. My command, he said in his report (Dec. 21, 1863), has marched, climbed, slid, and swam 340 miles since the 8th inst. He reported a loss of six men drowned, five wounded, and ninety missing. He performed gallant service under Hunter, Sigel, and Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley in 1864; and was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865. The same year he resigned his commission of captain in the regular army. He was consul-general at Montreal in 1866-69. In 1888, by special act of Congress, he was reappointed a captain in the army, and soon afterwards was retired. He died in Bath, N. Y., Feb. 3, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barre, Isaac, 1726-1802 (search)
ng a small tradesman in Dublin. Isaac entered the British army at the age of twenty-one, and participated in the expedition against Louisburg in 1758. Wolfe was his friend, and appointed him major of brigade; and in May, 1759, he was made adjutant-general of Wolfe's army that assailed Quebec. He was severely wounded in the battle on the Plains of Abraham, by which he lost the sight of one eye. Barre served under Amherst in 1760; and was the official bearer of the news of the surrender of Montreal to England. In 1761 he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and the same year he obtained a seat in Parliament, where he found himself in opposition to the ministry. For this offence he was deprived of his offices, given him as a reward for his services in America. He was the warm friend of the colonies, and made able speeches in Parliament in their favor. Barre was one of the supposed authors of the Letters of Junius. Strong in person, vigorous in mind, independent in thought and actio
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
cAug. 27, 1758 Alleghany MountainsSept. 21, 1758 Fort NiagaraJuly 25, 1759 MontmorenciJuly 31, 1759 Plains of AbrahamSept. 13, 1759 SilleryApril 28, 1760 Revolutionary War. LexingtonApril 19, 1775 Bunker (Breed's) HillJune 17, 1775 Near Montreal (Ethan Allen captured)Sept. 25, 1775 St. John's (Siege and Capture of)Oct. and Nov. 1775 Great BridgeDec. 9, 1775 QuebecDec. 31, 1775 Moore's Creek BridgeFeb. 27, 1776 Boston (Evacuation of)Mar. 17, 1776 Cedar RapidsMay 9, 1776 Three RivecAug. 27, 1758 Alleghany MountainsSept. 21, 1758 Fort NiagaraJuly 25, 1759 MontmorenciJuly 31, 1759 Plains of AbrahamSept. 13, 1759 SilleryApril 28, 1760 Revolutionary War. LexingtonApril 19, 1775 Bunker (Breed's) HillJune 17, 1775 Near Montreal (Ethan Allen captured)Sept. 25, 1775 St. John's (Siege and Capture of)Oct. and Nov. 1775 Great BridgeDec. 9, 1775 QuebecDec. 31, 1775 Moore's Creek BridgeFeb. 27, 1776 Boston (Evacuation of)Mar. 17, 1776 Cedar RapidsMay 9, 1776 Three Rive
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bedel, Timothy, 1740-1787 (search)
Bedel, Timothy, 1740-1787 Military officer; born in Salem, N. H., about 1740; was a brave and faithful officer in the war for independence. He was attached to the Northern army, and had the full confidence and esteem of General Schuyler, its commander. He was captain of rangers in 1775, and early in 1776 was made colonel of a New Hampshire regiment. He was with Montgomery at the capture of St. John's on the Sorel, and was afterwards in command at the Cedars, not far from Montreal, where a cowardly surrender bv a subordinate, in Bedel's absence, caused the latter to be tried by a court-martial, on a false charge, made by General Arnold. He was deprived of command for a while, but was reinstated. He died at Haverhill, N. H., in February, 1787.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beebe, Bezaleel, 1741-1824 (search)
Beebe, Bezaleel, 1741-1824 Military officer; born in Litchfield, Conn., April 28, 1741; was one of the Rogers Rangers, and was engaged in the fight in which Putnam was taken, also in the capture of Montreal in 1760. In July, 1775, he was commissioned lieutenant and sent to Boston. In 1776 he saw active service in New York and New Jersey, and was taken prisoner at the capture of Fort Washington and confined in New York nearly a year. Towards the end of the Revolution he was appointed brigadier-general and commander of all the Connecticut troops for sea-coast defence. He died in Litchfield, May 29, 1824.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bienville, Jean Baptiste le moyne, 1680-1701 (search)
Bienville, Jean Baptiste le moyne, 1680-1701 Pioneer; brother of Le Moyne Iberville, who founded a French settlement at Biloxi, near the mouth of the Mississippi, in 1698; born in Montreal, Feb. 23, 1680. For several years he was in the French naval service with Iberville, and accompanied him with his brother Sauville to Louisiana. In 1699 Bienville explored the country around Biloxi. Sauville was appointed governor of Louisiana in 1699, and the next year Bienville constructed a fort 54 miles above the mouth of the river. Sauville died in 1701, when Bienville took charge of the colony, transferring the seat of government to Mobile. In 1704 he was joined by his brother Chateaugay, who brought seventeen settlers from France. Soon afterwards a ship brought twenty young women as wives for settlers at Mobile. Iberville soon afterwards died, and Bienville, charged with misconduct, was dismissed from office in 1707. His successor dying on his way from( France, bienville retained
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