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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 48 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 4 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for St. John (Canada) or search for St. John (Canada) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
ona Passage, and found this important channel of commerce still unguarded by American men-of-war. In fact, it had remained so ever since his last visit, while an old commodore, with a large squadron, had been sailing about the Caribbean Sea, interfering with neutral commerce and watching the English mail-steamers that were pursuing their legitimate business. The Alabama had hardly got through the passage before she fell in with and captured the schooner Palmetto, from New York, bound to St. John's. Porto Rico. This vessel carried neutral goods, but they were not under consular seals, and Captain Semmes decided that they came under the rule, that when partners reside, some in a belligerent and some in a neutral country, the property of all of them, which has any connection with the house in the belligerent country, is liable to confiscation. It was wonderful how many rules of international law this officer could interpret to suit his own convenience; for only one or two instances
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
, if not tight, might be spoiled by water; but the rebels kept a vigilant eye on them, examining them at times and replacing them. There was a regular establishment here for their fabrication, under the charge of Mr. Gray, who held the position of captain. A part of the correspondence of this branch is now in my hands, from which it appears that there were thirty-five (35) to forty (40) hands employed, and that Mr. Gray distributed the barrel torpedoes along the coast from Georgetown to St. John's; he also transmitted a variety of material even as far as Mobile, and his connection was direct with several commanding officers. Woods and Thompson were employed in the department to build the torpedoes, as they express it. It appears that no great number of these was kept placed permanently in Charleston harbor, because they were dangerous to vessels moving about on the ordinary communications by water, and accidents had occurred. They could readily be put down in a very short ti