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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 95 95 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 67 57 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 47 23 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 27 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 2 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 8 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Alexandria (Virginia, United States) or search for Alexandria (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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— intelligence of the absence of Col. Wilcox not having reached me until the day after the battle — renders it impossible to give a more detailed statement. My duty as commander of the brigade being ended with this report, I am, sir, your obedient servant, J. H. Hobart Ward, Colonel Thirty-eighth Regiment, Second Brigade, Third Division. Official report of Lieut.-Col. Farnsworth. Headquarters Thirty-Eighth regiment, (Second Scott Life Guard,) N. Y. V., camp Scott, near Alexandria, Va., July 29, 1861. Col. J. H. H. Ward, Commanding Second Brigade, Third Division: sir: In compliance with my duty, I respectfully submit the following report of the operation of my regiment during the recent battle at or near Bull Run on the 21st of July, 1861. On the morning of the 21st, in obedience to brigade orders, the regiment was formed, the men equipped in light marching order, and prepared to leave its bivouac at or near Centreville. The march, however, was not commenced un
isposal, and a force of about ten squadrons of cavalry. Here follows an account of McClellan's Division in Western Virginia. The division under Gen. Patterson is about 22,000 strong, and has three batteries of artillery attached to it; and Gen. Mansfield, who commands the army of Washington and the reserve watching the Capitol, has under him a corps of 16,000 men almost exclusively volunteers; Gen. McDowell has also left a strong guard in his intrenchments along the right bank of the Potomac, guarding the bridges and covering the roads to Alexandria, Fairfax, and Falls Church. The division in military occupation of Maryland under Gen. Banks, most of which is concentrated in and around Baltimore, consists of 7,400 men, with some field-guns. The corps at Fortress Monroe and Hampton, under Gen. Butler, is 11,000 strong, with two field batteries, some guns of position, and the fortress itself in hand. Gen. Lyon, who is operating in Missouri with marked success, has about 6,500 m
H. Stringham, consists of 22 vessels, 296 guns, and 3,300 men. The squadron in the Gulf, under the command of Flag-Officer William Mervine, consists of 21 vessels, 282 guns, and 3,500 men. Additions have been made to each of the squadrons of two or three small vessels, that have been captured and taken into the service. The steamers Pawnee and Pocahontas, and the flotilla under the late Commander Ward, with several steamboats in charge of naval officers, have been employed on the Potomac River, to prevent communication with that portion of Virginia which is in insurrection. Great service has been rendered by this armed force, which has been vigilant in intercepting supplies, and in protecting transports and supply vessels in their passage up and down the Potomac. The flotilla, on the 27th ultimo, met with a serious and sad loss in the death of its gallant commander, James H. Ward, who died at his post, while covering the retreat of his men from the assault of an overpoweri
ants. Sacks of flour, meat, clothing, arms, equipments, and camp utensils were everywhere scattered over the ground, and the camp fires, probably prepared for the noon meal, were still brightly burning. The main body of this force had left with haste only about two hours before the arrival of the head of our column. The fortification itself was rudely constructed. It bears no comparison to the splendid works, scientifically planned and erected by the Union volunteers on the banks of the Potomac. It could have been easily taken by a flank movement, for which there was abundant opportunity, without exposing the assailants to the fire of the guns in position behind the intrenchments. As the head of the division was approaching the intrenchment, sharp firing was heard on the left, which was afterwards ascertained to have been occasioned by a skirmish between the advance of Col. Miles' division and the Alabamians, who were in position there about two miles from the Court House.
n to their original positions. By some misunderstanding, which is not satisfactorily explained, this brigade proceeded direct to Washington, one regiment, as understood, passing directly through the camp they left on the 16th inst. With great respect, your obedient servant, Daniel Tyler, Brig.-Gen. 1st Division. To Brig.-Gen. I. Mcdowell, Commander Department N. E. Virginia, Arlington. Official report of Colonel Pratt. Headquarters Thirty-First regiment N. Y. V., camp near Alexandria, Va., July 22, 1861. sir: In accordance with paragraph 723 of General Regulations for the United States Army, I have the honor to report the operations of my regiment during the engagement of yesterday. In obedience to your order, the regiment was ready to march from camp, near Centreville, at 2.30 A. M. While proceeding to the field, I was detached from my regiment and ordered to take command of the Sixteenth and Thirty-second regiments New York Volunteers, to support Lieut. Pratt's b
Doc. 138.-Colonel miles' defence. Col. Miles commanded the reserves, at the battle of Bull Run. Being accused of drunkenness and other conduct unbecoming a soldier, he published the following card, in the Washington Star, of August 1: Alexandria, Va., July 31, 1861. Editor of the Star — dear sir: Will you please give place in your columns to a short reply from an old soldier, in correction of Col. Richardson's report, as published in this morning's Sun. Perhaps no one has ever before been hunted with more assiduous, malicious vituperation and falsehood, since the battle of Bull Run, than myself. My name, I am told, has been a byword in the streets of Washington and its bar-rooms for every thing derogatory to my character. It was stated I had deserted to the enemy; I was a traitor, being from Maryland, a sympathizer; gave the order to retreat; was in arrest, and now, by Col. Richardson's report, drunk. I shall not copy Richardson's report, but correct the errors he