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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 95 95 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 67 57 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 47 23 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 27 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 16 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 2 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 8 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Alexandria (Virginia, United States) or search for Alexandria (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
s, Kentucky, was begun. These successes made the Federal Administration impatient to push forward operations in Virginia. At the urgent representation of General McClellan, President Lincoln had yielded his favorite plan of campaign — an advance against the Confederate lines at Manassas — and had reluctantly consented to the transfer of the Army of the Potomac to Fortress Monroe, and its advance thence on Richmond. Before he would allow McClellan, however, to begin the transfer, the Potomac river below Washington must be cleared of Confederate batteries, the Baltimore and Ohio railroad must be recovered and protected, and all the approaches to Washington must be made secure. See McClellan's report. To fulfill a part of these conditions, Banks' and Lander's commands were ordered forward, and on February 24th General Banks occupied Harper's Ferry. Soon after, McClellan began the movements on his other wing, that were preparatory to an attack on the Confederate batteries alo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate losses during the war — correspondence between Dr. Joseph Jones and General Samuel Cooper. (search)
e records will be thoroughly sifted, and the story they tell given to the world; but in the meantime the carefully collated figures of this correspondence will be of interest and value. New Orleans, August 2d, 1869. General S. Cooper, Alexandria, Virginia: Dear Sir — You will please excuse the liberty which I take in trespassing upon your valuable time. I have recently been preparing for the Southern Historical Society a paper upon the losses of the Confederate army from battle, woundeat respect and the highest esteem, I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, Joseph Jones, M. D., Secretary and Treasurer Southern Historical Society, Professor of Chemistry, Medical Department, University of Louisiana. near Alexandria, Va., August 29th, 1869. Dr. Joseph Jones, Secretary and Treasurer Southern Historical Society, New Orleans, Louisiana: Dear Sir — I have had the honor to receive your kind and interesting letter of the 2d instant and beg you will accept my be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Foreign recognition of the Confederacy — letter from Honorable James Lyons. (search)
of illustrating the injustice and inhumanity of it more strongly, I said, after pointing out the horrors to flow from it, commencing with the right of suffrage and political equality which must be conferred upon them, Suppose, that to avoid these ills, we of the South were to emancipate all the slaves — then about two million five hundred thousand in round numbers — and could drive them all across the Potomac, what would you say to it? He replied, We would meet you on the north bank of the Potomac with all the muskets and bayonets we could command and drive them back or drive them into the river. Then, said I, you admit that you would inflict upon your white brethren of the South an evil so great that, rather than be subjected to it yourselves, you would put to death two million five hundred thousand of your pets, the objects of your philanthropy? Well, said he, I can't help that. Not very long after that the election took place, followed by the war, the more immediate agents in p