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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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large force that would attack them the next day, and caused their hasty retreat. Our troops took possession of the town and held it several weeks. This victory added fresh glory to Dickison's command, and inspired in them the hope of future brilliant achievements to be crowned with like success. By instructions of Gen. Braxton Bragg, Maj.-Gen. Patton Anderson was directed to report to General Hood for duty in the field, and he left Florida on the 26th of July, 1864. On his arrival at Atlanta he was assigned to command of his old division. Gen. John K. Jackson was ordered to the command of the district of Florida, and he remained on duty until the 30th of September, when he was succeeded by Gen. William Miller, of the First regiment of Florida volunteers, who had been relieved from duty as commandant of conscripts. Encouraged by the success of the expedition against our posts at Cedar creek and Camp Milton, another, more formidable, was attempted and successfully carried out b
battle of Peachtree Creek, and shared the desperate fighting of Hardee's corps in the flank attack and battle of July 22d. Then being transferred to the extreme west flank of the army they were under a terrible fire on August 3d, and marched a mile in advance of the general line and established General Bate's picket line near Utoy creek, where they fought the enemy, repulsing every attack in the memorable battle of the 6th. They were engaged in continual skirmishing during the siege of Atlanta, and on August 27th were ordered to Rough-and-Ready. After skirmishing near Flint river the brigade moved to Jonesboro, where they participated in the battles of August 31st and September 1st. On the retreat they skirmished at Lovejoy station, Bearcreek and Palmetto. During Hood's campaigns against Sherman's communications the Florida soldiers assisted in the capture of Dalton and the blockhouse in Mill Creek gap, skirmished at Decatur, Ala., and Columbia, Tenn., and under the command o
ing five months in that capacity he was ordered to report to General Hood at Atlanta, Ga., in July, 1864, and on his arrival was assigned to his old division, which verely wounded, causing his disability until after Johnston's army had reached Atlanta. At Jonesboro in an assault upon the enemy's lines he was again seriously woua gun was lost in the several retreats of the army of Tennessee from Dalton to Atlanta in 1864. The works at the Chattahoochee, which Sherman declared were the bestval of Johnston General Hood made Shoup his chief of staff. After the fall of Atlanta he was relieved at his own request. He was the author of a pamphlet urging thth, at Sewanee, Tenn. He is the author of a work on Infantry Tactics; while in Atlanta, in 1864, prepared a text-book on Artillery Division Drill, and in 1874 he pub command at Weldon. He was commanding in North Carolina when the war ended. General Walker removed to Georgia after the war, and in 1898 was a citizen of Atlanta.