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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. (search)
y record with the masses, who were ignorant of the situation, the most if not all of whom were his admirers, and to the ability of his little army, to give battle to the overwhelming odds under Sherman, for the one last lingering hope of holding Atlanta, the key to the Confederacy. And, though failing in the end, gallantly did he redeem his responsible pledge. The venture was hazardous in the extreme, and it required brave officers to meet the emergency. 'Twas then that the brave and chivaied and true men, were promoted to the rank of general officers, in which capacity their military skill was more urgently needed and their valuable services could at the same time be rewarded The battles of the 22d and 28th of July, 1864, around Atlanta, and at Jonesboroa on the 31st August following, attested the wisdom of these appointments. And although we were not successful in the immediate results of the battlefield, we showed to the haughty enemy that all chivalry was not buried in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
grew into a place of some value for repairs, &c. The Ordnance shops at Nashville had been hurriedly transferred to Atlanta, Ga., on the fall of Fort Donelson; and when Atlanta was seriously threatened by the operations of Sherman the Arsenal therAtlanta was seriously threatened by the operations of Sherman the Arsenal there, which had become very important, was moved to Columbus, Ga., where there was the nucleus of an Ordnance establishment. Colonel M. H. Wright soon made this nearly as valuable as his arsenal at Atlanta had been. Armories and small arms. BesiAtlanta had been. Armories and small arms. Besides the Arsenals, a brief account of which has just been given, we had the armories at Richmond and Fayetteville, N. C.; and arms were also made at other points. The State of Virginia claimed all the machinery captured at Harper's Ferry, and was in a little over two years created, almost literally out of the ground, foundries and rolling mills (at Selma, Richmond, Atlanta, and Macon), smelting works (at Petersburg), chemical works (at Charlotte, N. C.), a powder mill far superior to any in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Development of the arsenals, armories and other places of manufacture of Ordnance stores. (search)
, near the south line of Virginia, and it grew into a place of some value for repairs, &c. The Ordnance shops at Nashville had been hurriedly transferred to Atlanta, Ga., on the fall of Fort Donelson; and when Atlanta was seriously threatened by the operations of Sherman the Arsenal there, which had become very important, was m., on the fall of Fort Donelson; and when Atlanta was seriously threatened by the operations of Sherman the Arsenal there, which had become very important, was moved to Columbus, Ga., where there was the nucleus of an Ordnance establishment. Colonel M. H. Wright soon made this nearly as valuable as his arsenal at Atlanta had been.., on the fall of Fort Donelson; and when Atlanta was seriously threatened by the operations of Sherman the Arsenal there, which had become very important, was moved to Columbus, Ga., where there was the nucleus of an Ordnance establishment. Colonel M. H. Wright soon made this nearly as valuable as his arsenal at Atlanta had been.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Central laboratory. (search)
s of production; hampered by want of transportation even of the commonest supplies of food; with no stock on hand even of the articles, such as steel, copper, lead, iron, leather, which we must have to build up our establishments; and in spite of these deficiencies we persevered at home as determinedly as did our troops in the field against a more tangible opposition, and in a little over two years created, almost literally out of the ground, foundries and rolling mills (at Selma, Richmond, Atlanta, and Macon), smelting works (at Petersburg), chemical works (at Charlotte, N. C.), a powder mill far superior to any in the United States and unsurpassed by any across the ocean, and a chain of arsenals, armories and laboratories equal in their capacity and their improved appointments to the best of those in the United States, stretching link by link from Virginia to Alabama. Our people are justly proud of the valor and constancy of the troops which bore their banners bravely in the front
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
er we are daily receiving, will serve to show something of the appreciation of our friends for the work in which we are engaged. A reverend friend, who did faithful and warmly appreciated work in one of the brigades of the Army of Northern Virginia, writes as follows on a postal card: St. Louis, December 26, 1883. Have not the most remote idea of not renewing my subscription. Will remit early in January. Fraternally, —— —— ——. Another gallant soldier writes as follows: Atlanta, Ga., December 14th, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: Dear Sir,—Inclosed I hand you draft for ten dollars ($10), to be placed to my credit for subscription to the Southern Historical papers. I know I am in arrears, but do not know how much. One thing I do know, and that is I do not want to be denied the pleasure of reading the papers every month. Whenever I am behind, jog me up. If the enclosed is worthy a place among the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A morning call on General Kilpatrick. (search)
that of General Sherman. In the popular imagination he figures as the mighty conqueror, whose campaign in Georgia and the Carolinas virtually ended the war between the States. His March to the Sea has been lauded and rhymed about until it has come to be deemed an achievement worthy to live for all time in song and story. In point of fact it was nothing of the kind, but was, in a military point of view, a very commonplace affair. When the army which had barred his further progress before Atlanta had vanished on its ill-starred errand into Tennessee, there was no hostile force of any consequence before him, and this it required but the most ordinary intelligence on his part to perceive. Surely he must have possessed an intensely Falstaffian imagination to have conjured up many men in buckram in the deserted fields, the silent swamps and lonely pine woods through which his march would lie. And there is good ground for believing that even the idea of cutting loose from his base and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
oyed a bath in the Alabama river at Montgomery, and called to see my friend Mrs. H——and family. Met with a most cordial welcome, and the dear, good woman filled my haversack with biscuit, chicken, and teacakes. What a feast the boys had on my return to camp! At five o'clock Tuesday evening we left West Point, and passed La Grange, running at full speed. A number of Georgia's fair daughters were at the depot, and as we passed waved their welcome to the hospitalities of the State. Passed Atlanta about daylight, and arrived at Marietta at six o'clock. As the train was delayed here for several hours, a beautiful young lady from South Carolina prepared breakfast for the soldiers. After a sumptuous feast prepared and served by the fair hands of our patriotic southern girl, I walked out to see my sweet cousin, Mrs. McL——, and returned just in time to jump on the train as it was moving off. At nine o'clock in the evening we reached Chattanooga, having executed a flank movement wonderf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's march from Atlanta to the coast-address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Ga., April 20th, 1884. (search)
General Sherman's march from Atlanta to the coast-address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Ga., April 20th, 1884. By Colonel mashing things to the sea. So wrote Major-General Sherman, from Atlanta, to Lieutenant-General Grant. That officer having sanctioned the e wanton, merciless, and almost total destruction of the cities of Atlanta and Rome. For the purposes of the incursion the Federal army wa seventh day, exclusive of the day of march. General Sherman left Atlanta on the 16th in company with the Fourteenth Corps, brevet Major-Genuct of the Federals during this vaunted march of Gen. Sherman from Atlanta to the sea, and I will, my friends, trespass no longer upon your pn the region of country thirty miles on either side of a line from Atlanta to Savannah, as also the sweet potatoes, cattle, hogs, sheep and pdvance and on the flanks of the main columns during the march from Atlanta to the coast, is reprehensible in the extreme. Not content with t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from General Lee to President Davis on the situation in September, 1863. (search)
y entered Chattanooga on the 9th, and that General Bragg has retired still further into the interior. It also appears that General Burnside did not move to make a junction with Rosecrans, but marched upon Knoxville. General Bragg must, therefore, either have been misinformed of his movements or he subsequently changed them. Had I been aware that Knoxville was the destination of General Burnside, I should have recommended that General Longstreet should be sent to oppose him, instead of to Atlanta. If General Bragg is unable to bring General Rosecrans to battle, I think it would be better to return General Longstreet to this army to enable me to oppose the advance of General Meade with a greater prospect of success. And it is a matter worthy of consideration whether General Longstreet's corps will reach General Bragg in time and condition to be of any advantage to him. If the report sent to me by General Cooper since my return from Richmond is correct, General Bragg had, on the 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
on was as to its feasibility. It is worthy of notice, that in his communication to Soule, General Beauregard foresees, with the clearness of a true prophet, that Atlanta is the objective point of the enemy, and predicts the consequences that would and did ensue should the enemy take possession of that strategic point. This plan was communicated to the War Department, and no action taken upon it. About eleven months later Atlanta fell, and the Southern Confederacy was mortally wounded. The sword of Sherman had gone through its vital parts. Beauregard had prophesied correctly. If the man-of-war had been fanciful in his military scheme of salvation, the rivate life after his final struggle in favor of the Lost Cause. General Beauregard, he says, bitterly reflected on General Sherman's long and slow march from Atlanta to Savannah, from Savannah to Goldsboroa, and from Goldsboroa to Raleigh, a distance of 650 miles, which it had taken him 100 days, or an average of six miles a d