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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War Diary of Capt. Robert Emory Park, Twelfth Alabama Regiment. January 28th, 1863January 27th, 1864. (search)
85 miles. July 17. Fare from Weldon to Raleigh $5.00, 98 miles. From Raleigh to Charlotte, 175 miles, fare $8.75. July 18. Half fare to Columbia, S. C., 110 miles, $3.25. July 19. Half fare to Augusta, Ga., 143 miles, $3.25, half to Atlanta, 171 miles, $4.00, and full fare from Atlanta to La Grange, 71 miles, $3.50. Arrived at La Grange, my birthplace, 11 o'clock at night, and went to my sister's, Mrs. M. C. Huntley's. July 21. Anniversary of Battle of Manassas. Hired Tommy DaAtlanta to La Grange, 71 miles, $3.50. Arrived at La Grange, my birthplace, 11 o'clock at night, and went to my sister's, Mrs. M. C. Huntley's. July 21. Anniversary of Battle of Manassas. Hired Tommy Davis to drive me to Greenville, going 20 miles in 6 1/2 hours. Had a joyful meeting with my mother and sister. July 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30. Happy days at home, sweet home, with the dearest of mothers and best of sisters. My brothers came to see me. August 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Visited old comrades at Auburn, Loachapoka, Tuskege, and Montgomery, Ala. Captain J. H. Echols gave me passport. Got transportation to Richmond of Major Calhoun. August 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10. Went to G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fragments of war history relating to the coast defence of South Carolina, 1861-‘65, and the hasty preparations for the Battle of Honey Hill, November 30, 1864. (search)
y had, too, looked on for months at the unequal conflict in Georgia; had seen the mistake of removing General Joseph E. Johnston from the command of that devoted army of the West, with its lofty spirit and enduring heart; followed by the fall of Atlanta; and, finally, had witnessed the only army possibly available for the defence of three States, inexplicably—most strangely—dispatched in pursuit of a military mirage in Tennessee, where it was practically destroyed. All lost! but by the gravesld. He was appointed Secretary of War by President Davis, but served only a short time. In February, 1863, he took charge of a foundery in Georgia, casting cannon for the Confederate army. When General Sherman initiated his campaign against Atlanta in 1864 General Smith was chosen commander of the Georgia State militia, and was Governor Brown's right-hand man in those stirring times and remained with those troops until the end, proving himself a valuable officer and winning the entire conf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
back the victor of Gettysburg to Centreville, and defying him at Mine Run; and strove with ill-fated and shining valor to regain at Franklin what had been lost at Atlanta. In the long struggle from Dalton to Atlanta, he illustrated the stubborn valor of his race. Ragged, starved, outnumbered, barefooted, without money, in freeziAtlanta, he illustrated the stubborn valor of his race. Ragged, starved, outnumbered, barefooted, without money, in freezing storms, without hope save in the miracles of his valor and the skill of his leaders, he concentrated what he could of scant numbers, and won victory at Kingston and Bentonville, in the vain hope to save North Carolina, and repel the army which had struck at the life of Richmond from its rear. Here he struggled to the last at Bld was traversed by Wheeler's Cavalry, and there are but few places where fights did not occur. But why recount these details? From Chattanooga, leading towards Atlanta, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, step by step, town by town, in fact, there was not sufficient to make a respectable farm land between Chattanooga, Tenn., or, I mi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
efore the main action opened, the audacity and adroitness which checked the advance of a whole brigade for several hours with one (2) gun and a few dismounted cavalry, and the soldierly ability with which artillery and infantry were so handled, as to inflict a loss of 750 men, while losing only 50, all deserve the highest praise; on their side good generalship, on ours the reverse. On the day of Honey Hill the disastrous Battle of Franklin was fought; then quickly followed the burning of Atlanta, the fall of Savannah, the burning of Columbia, Averysboro, Bentonville and the surrenders at Goldsboro and Appomattox! The Confederate armies! how memory goes back to their wonderful achievements! Their high soldierly qualities! Their whole career, marked by a virile spirit; a decisive energy; a brave persistence; a patient endurance, which reflect the high military qualities of the men of the same race, kin beyond sea, who won victory for Wolfe at Quebec! Made Ingliss hold Lucknow ag
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Pensioning of the Confederate soldier by the United States. (search)
were long ago settled by the arbitrament of arms, and the time has now come in the evolution of sentiment and feeling, under the Providence of God, when in the spirit of fraternity we should share with you in the care of the graves of the Confederate soldiers. This camp cordially accepts the assurances thus given by the President in the same spirit which prompted its utterance, and honors the sincere purpose which actuated him in expressing this patriotic sentiment. But the incident at Atlanta has been used by some misguided persons to introduce into Federal politics two widely different questions: (i) The admission of Confederate veterans into National Soldiers' Homes and (2) the gift of pensions to Confederate soldiers. It is against such mock humanity and false pretences that this camp desires to record its indignant protest. The Confederate soldier is unwilling to be placed on the pension rolls of the United States or to become the recipient of any of its bounties. The