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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarkable record of the Haskells of South Carolina. (search)
rite in society and a gallant officer was John Cleves Haskell, lieutenant-colonel of light artillery when he surrendered with Lee. He married Miss Stella Hampton, who died two decades ago, leaving one daughter and three sons, all now grown up. About seven years ago Colonel Haskell married Miss Lucy Hampton, daughter of Colonel Frank Hampton, who was killed at Brandy Station. They now live in Columbia. Very much alive is the sixth brother, Joseph Cleves Haskell, now a resident of busy Atlanta and popular in his new home. When he gave up his sword at Appomattox he was captain and adjutant-general of the First Artillery Corps, on the staff of General E. P. Alexander. He married Miss Mary Elizabeth Cheves and the pair have a grown famly of three sons and a daughter. Last in this remarkable family roster comes Lewis Wardlaw Haskell. He was but a youth when paroled with the remnant of the Army of Northern Virginia, having already served one year as lieutenant of reserves on th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The surrender of Gen. R. E. Lee. (search)
ourse, I did not offer him mine. All that was said about swords was that General Grant apologized to me for not having his own sword, saying that it had been taken off in his baggage, and he had been unable to get it in time. General John B. Gordon, in his Reminiscences of the Civil war, page 462, says, in speaking of General Grant: In his Memoirs he has given a quietus to that widely circulated romance that he returned to Lee his proffered sword. I do not doubt that he would have done so; but there was no occasion for Lee's offering it, because in the terms agreed upon it was stipulated that the Confederate officers retain their sidearms. I have seen a Northern history in which Lee was represented as presenting his sword to Grant. Correct history is all we ask for — no prevaricating on either side. And I would ask that our young people especially be taught the truth of this matter. Respectfully, W. B. Conway, M. D., Late Corporal Co. C, 4th Va. Cav. Atlanta, Ga.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.59 (search)
did service as signal officer in C. S. N., on James River Station. J. W. Hollywood, Louisville, Ky.—Engineer C. S. N.; served on steamer Morgan. ——Haywood, Atlanta, Ga.—Served on steamer Morgan. George E. Hazelhurst, Charleston, S. C.—Served as secretary to Flag Officer Duncan Ingraham, at Charleston, S. C.; delivered naval, Tenn.—Midshipman U. S. N., lieutenant C. S. N.; served on Savannah Station, ram Arkansas, and in battle with U. S. fleets; in battery at Port Hudson, on steamer Atlanta, aboard steamer Shenandoah. Clarence L. Stanton, Cincinnati, Ohio—Lieutenant C. S. N.; served at Charleston, on cruiser Chickamauga, at Fort Fisher; captured born in Pennsylvania; served on steamer Huntress; captured at Fort Pulaski as a member of the Oglethorpe Light Infantry; prisoner at Johnson's Island; on steamer Atlanta, at capture of U. S. gunboats Satellite and Reliance, on C. S. steamer Fredericksburg; special duty; surrendered with Lee's Army. Dan M. Varden, Sparks,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Federal Atrocities in the Civil war. From the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August 10, 1902. (search)
e to General James H. Wilson from Summerville, Ga.: I am going into the very bowels of the Confederacy, and propose to leave a trail that will be recognized fifty years hence. To Colonel A. Beckwith he wrote of same date: I propose to abandon Atlanta and the railroad back to Chattanooga, and sally forth to ruin Georgia, and bring up on the seashore. To General Grant he wrote on that date—I am perfecting arrangements to break up the railroad in front of Dalton, .including the city of AtlantaAtlanta, and push into Georgia, break up all its railroads and depots, capture its horses and negroes and make desolation everywhere. All these promises he literally fulfilled, as witness the pages. of history. But coming back to Memphis, we find General Sherman issuing the following special orders, No. 283, as shown in war record, No. 17, part 2, page 280: headquarters first Division, district of West Tennessee, Memphis, October 8, 1862. The 46th Ohio, Colonel Walcutt, will embark to-night
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.65 (search)
onclusion that the leading minds in the South were, to his knowledge, very far from identifying slavery, in the abstract, with the Confederate cause. In corroboration of this inference I would recall: 1. A proclamation of President Abraham Lincoln, issued at the beginning of the war. In it he tried to bribe the Southern States back into the Union by the promise of the maintenance of slavery, and failed. 2. A speech by President Jefferson Davis, delivered, I believe, in 1864, and at Atlanta, Ga. In it he expressed the following sentiments (I quote from memory): There are some who talk of a return to the Union with slavery maintained, but who would thus sacrifice honor to interest. With this quotation I will close my narrative. The plain statement of facts it contains will, I have no doubt, convince any unbiased reader that the supposed scheme of a retrocession of Louisiana never had any foundation in fact. Indeed I should not have thought it necessary even to contradict such