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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 14, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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e expiration of President Lincoln's term of office. Everybody, however, is sick of hostilities, and the troops desire to return to their homes; yet one constantly hears the remark, "You may exterminate us, but you cannot subjugate us." A French gentleman from Georgia, by way of Richmond, arrived in New York on the 9th, with some "interesting details concerning the spirit and the operations of the rebels in the various parts of the country through which he passed." On his way from Atlanta to Richmond he saw the country people enlisting for the war indicative of a strong national feeling and of the sense of the perils to which the Confederacy was exposed. As to those who showed a reluctance to muster, they were compelled by the force of public opinion, and sometimes by physical compulsion, to join the others. The sentiments expressed in his presence were indicative of the immutable resolution to conquer the independence of the South or to perish in the conflict. In so