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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 874 98 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 411 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 353 235 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 353 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 345 53 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 321 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 282 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 253 1 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 242 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 198 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) or search for Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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the Secretary of War on the first opportunity. The fifth of May was devoted by the Committee to concluding their labors upon the investigation of the Fort Pillow massacre. On the sixth of May, however, the Committee proceeded to Annapolis and Baltimore, and examined the condition of our returned soldiers, and took the testimony of several of them, together with the testimony of surgeons and other persons in attendance upon the hospitals. That testimony, with the communication of the Secretard and been permitted to return to us to a condition, both physically and mentally, which no language we can use can adequately describe. Though nearly all the patients now in the Naval Academy Hospital at Annapolis, and in the West Hospital in Baltimore, have been under the kindest and most intelligent treatment for about three weeks past, and many of them for a greater length of time, still they present literally the appearance of living skeletons, many of them being nothing but skin and bone
at this time occupied by us simply as outposts. Neither place was susceptible of a good defence. Directions were therefore given, on the eleventh June, to withdraw their garrisons to Harper's Ferry, but these orders were not obeyed, and on the thirteenth Winchester was attacked, and its armament and a part of the garrison captured. Lee now crossed the Potomac near Williamsport, and directed his march upon Harrisburgh. General Hooker followed on his right flank, covering Washington and Baltimore. On reaching Frederick, Md., on the twenty-eighth June, he was, at his own request, relieved from the command, and Major-General Meade appointed in his place. During these movements, cavalry skirmishes took place at Beverly Ford, Brandy Station, Berryville, and Aldie, some of which were quite severe, but, in the absence of detailed reports, I am unable to give the losses on either side. When General Meade, under orders of the President, took command of the army of the Potomac, on the
body now lies in its white winding-sheet of snow on the spot where it fell, a few feet from the tent in which I write. A few yards from Captain Smith lies cold in death, in a pool of his own now frozen blood, the body of Lieutenant Colson, of Baltimore, and one of General Trimble's rebel staff, as will appear from the following pass found upon his person: Culpeper Court-house, July 27, 1863. Guards and pickets will pass Lieutenant Colson, Major-General Trimble's staff, in and out at m Florence. Further on, on the edge of the camp, lie three dead rebel soldiers, name and rank unknown. Three prisoners are also in our hands, two of them severely if not fatally wounded; of the latter, one is Lieutenant William Turner, of Baltimore. He says his uncle, Captain Turner, recently commanded the United States war vessel Ironsides, at Charleston. The name of the other wounded rebel soldier is Paxton, who resides near Leesburgh, in this county. Many of the wounded rebels a
ee or tory preachers. Every office would be bestowed on aliens. Absenteeism would curse us with all its vices. Superadded to these, sinking us into a lower abyss of degradation, we would be made the slaves of our slaves, hewers of wood and drawers of water for those upon whom God has stamped indelibly the marks of physical and intellectual inferiority. The past of foreign countries need not be sought unto to furnish illustrations of the heritage of shame that subjugation would entail. Baltimore, St. Louis, Nashville, Knoxville, New-Orleans, Vicksburgh, Huntsville, Norfolk, Newbern, Louisville, and Fredericksburgh are the first fruits of the ignominy and poverty of Yankee domination. The sad story of the wrongs and indignities endured by those States which have been in the complete or partial possession of the enemy, will give the best evidence of the consequences of subjugation. Missouri, a magnificent empire of agricultural and mineral wealth, is to-day a smoking ruin and th