hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 874 98 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 411 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 353 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 353 235 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 345 53 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 321 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 282 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 253 1 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 242 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 198 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) or search for Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
neral Elzey to hold the ford just below the railroad bridge. He placed the regiment in a skirt of wood near the river, but hidden from the view of the enemy, and ordered Captain Goldsborough to deploy company A as skirmishers on the bank. The Baltimore Light Artillery was posted on a mound on our right. Soon the enemy appeared in column in the open ground on the opposite side. They rapidly placed two guns in position and opened on the Baltimore battery, which was plainly visible. That immeacquaintance, and the feeling had got to be quite warm in reciprocity. If there was anything we did desire, next to marching down Baltimore street, it was to get as close to the bogus First Maryland as possible. We knew that while it had many Baltimore men in it, a large proportion were Dutch Yankees, and such people, and had a private idea that any intimate intercourse between the two regiments would not be healthy for them. And, now here they were, close at hand. It was delightful. While
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Editorial paragraphs. The reunion and banquet of the Society of Confederate States army and Navy in the State of Maryland, came off at the Eutaw House, Baltimore, on the night of February 21st, and was a really magnificent affair. The beautiful tables groaned beneath all of the delicacies of the season, sweet music enlivened the occasion, the committee in charge and the Maryland soldiers generally were all attention and courtesy to their guests, the speeches seemed to be heartily enjoyed, and the mingling together of old comrades a delightful recalling of the hallowed memories of the brave old days of ‘61-‘65. The regular toasts were as follows: 1. The Army and Navy of the Confederate States. This was responded to in an eloquent and effective speech by Hon. Charles E. Hooker, of Mississippi, whose empty sleeve gave touching testimony to the faithfulness with which he served as a private soldier in the Army of Northern Virginia. He was loudly applauded. 2. Our Cavalry
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the attempted formation of a N. W. Confederacy. (search)
cheme, if I found it practicable to do so. I did order General Bradley T. Johnson to move in that direction with his brigade, after cutting the railroads between Baltimore and Philadelphia and Baltimore and Washington; and he had started and crossed the railroad between Washington and Baltimore, when, having learned that two corps Baltimore and Washington; and he had started and crossed the railroad between Washington and Baltimore, when, having learned that two corps had arrived at Washington from Grant's army, he informed me of the fact by a courier who reached me in front of Washington on the night of the 11th of July. Realizing the fact then that there was no possible hope of capturing Washington, I determined to retire, and sent an order to General Johnson to rejoin me. The attempt to releBaltimore, when, having learned that two corps had arrived at Washington from Grant's army, he informed me of the fact by a courier who reached me in front of Washington on the night of the 11th of July. Realizing the fact then that there was no possible hope of capturing Washington, I determined to retire, and sent an order to General Johnson to rejoin me. The attempt to release the prisoners at Point Lookout was not made for reasons not at all connected with my operations. If there was this scheme for releasing the prisoners in the North and Northwest, which was to be carried out in connection with my advance on Washington, it is a little singular that General Lee gave me no information of it when
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4.37 (search)
Wentworth, Sergeant of Co. B. F. Farr, Sergeant of Co. F. W. Joseph Franck, Sergeant of Co. D. Calvin Myers, Sergeant of Co. E. Ch. N. Ferriot, Sergeant of Co. G. Edwin Selvage, Color-Bearer. The large Regimental State Standard, they directed the Colonel to have emblazoned with their battles and deposited with the Historical Society of Virginia, to be by it retained, until Maryland joins the Southern Confederacy, when it is to be turned over to the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore. He found it impossible to have it properly painted, but placed it in charge of Thomas H. Wynne, Esq., of Richmond, to be properly fixed and given to the Virginia Historical Society. On it should be imprinted or painted the names of Manassas First, Munson's Hill, Upton's Hill, Hall's Hill, Sangster's Station, Rappahannock, Front Royal, Winchester, Bolivar Heights, Harrisonburg (Bucktails), Cross Keys, Port Republic, Cold Harbor, Malvern Hill and Westover, being fifteen battles and skir
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ex-Confederates in New Jersey. (search)
, bearing gifts and a hearty invitation from Wilkes Post to visit them in Trenton. The kind invitation was accepted and arrangements for the visit entrusted to a committee. Captain David N. Walker was made officer in charge. About seventy-five men, representing the three organizations above named, composed the visiting party. We left Richmond April 12th, on the 5 A. M. train, all hands having been made Colonels by the officer in charge. It was a jolly party on pleasure bent. At Baltimore we received several recruits in the persons of old Otey battery men resident there, and at Philadelphia more still. Here also the party was met by a committee of gentlemen from Wilkes Post, who had been sent on to meet and welcome us at, as it were, the outer wall. The enthusiasm there was great and evidenced great heartiness of esteem. Captain Wilkes, the genial commander who came with Wilkes Post to Richmond, was with this committee, and his countenance was radiant with pleasure as he
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
urtesies and kindnesses that are so eminently grateful to a prisoner of war. I shall, therefore, esteem it a peculiar and personal favor if you will extend to Major Warley any and every practical kindness that may be in your power, whether in the way of pecuniary assistance (for which I will be responsible to you), or of greater personal liberty, by parole or otherwise, that he may desire or you may find admissible. By so doing you will confer a favor upon me that I shall be proud to acknowledge. And should any officers of the Fifth United States Artillery be stationed at Fort McHenry, or any other officers of the old service, I shall be grateful if you will show them this letter, and ask such personal civilities toward Major Warley as the nature of your duties may forbid, but which I can confidently ask from them as a brother officer. And I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, T. Seymour, Brigadier-General V. S. Vole. Commanding Officer Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Md.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes on Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862. (search)
st Maryland regiment, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson. Seventh Brigade.--Fifteenth Alabama regiment, Colonel Jas. Cantey; Sixteenth Mississippi regiment, Colonel Carnot Posey; Twenty-first Georgia regiment, Colonel J. F. Mercer; Twenty-first North Carolina regiment, Colonel W. W. Kirkland. Eighth Brigade.--Sixth Louisiana regiment, Colonel J. G. Seymour; Seventh Louisiana regiment, Colonel H. T. Hays; Eighth Louisiana regiment, Colonel H. B. Kelly; Ninth Louisiana regiment, Colonel Randolph. Baltimore Light Artillery, Captain Brockenbrough; Courtney Artillery, Captain A. R. Courtney; Johnson's Virginia battery (the Bedford battery), I am persuaded, was also with us at this time. I know we had three batteries. C. B. Wheat's special Louisiana battalion, Major C. R. Wheat. The Second and Sixth Virginia cavalry were left with General Ewell by General J. E. B. Stuart, when he went to the Peninsula, a few days after our first skirmish, and the burning of the railroad bridge over the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
e operations at Vicksburg, &c., follow upon and relieve the recital of its adventures among the mountains of East Tennessee and the open fields of Kentucky. On the 24th of October, 1861, Henry B. Latrobe, eldest son of John H. B. Latrobe, of Baltimore, together with John B. Rowan, William T. Patten, William L. Ritter, and other Marylanders, then at Richmond, Virginia, began vigorous measures for recruiting a company of artillery. The first-named gentleman was already authorized to organize rmy. The company was mustered into the Confederete States service as the Third Maryland Artillery, on January the 14th, 1862, to serve during the war. The following is the list of the officers at that time: Captain, Henry B. Latrobe, of Baltimore, Md.; Senior First Lieutenant, Ferdinand O. Claiborne, of New Orleans, La.; Junior First Lieutenant, John B. Rowan, of Elkton, Cecil county, Md.; Second Lieutenant, William T. Patten, of Port Deposit, Cecil county, Md.; Orderly Sergeant, William L
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Third Battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
d, and two were killed, Captain Claiborne and private John S. Cosson. Captain Claiborne was struck by a piece of shell, on the 22nd of June, and fell without uttering a word. He was a fine officer, and a braver one never drew blade in any cause. In him the South lost a generous, gallant and magnanimous man. He was a native of Mississippi, a grandson of General F. L. Claiborne, of Natchez, well known among the early settlers of Alabama, and a cousin of Ferdinand C. Latrobe, ex-Mayor of Baltimore. During his early youth his father removed to New Orleans, where the son was educated. At the outbreak of the war he joined Captain Gladdin's company of Cresent City Rifles, and served for a time at Pensacola, and afterward in Virginia. In September, 1861, he was transferred to the Third Maryland. His wound was through the heart and he died instantly. Lieutenant Rowan was promoted to the Captaincy, on the 30th of June, and Lieutenant Ritter was made First Lieutenant, Lieutenant Gile
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.83 (search)
hey seemed afraid to make any manifestation of their feelings — only smiling covertly. The marching soldiery did not imitate the cautious silence of the Frederick Citizens; they had full haversacks, and therefore light hearts, jokes, witicisms, and badinage flew from lip to lip, and some one striking up a song, it was chanted by the brigade, and in that way we went through the most loyal city in Maryland. The following intercepted letter, from a Union lady in Frederick to a friend in Baltimore, thus speaks of the passage of our army. Frederick City, Maryland, September 13th, 1862. I wish, my dearest Minnie, you could have witnessed the transit of the Rebel army through our streets a day or two ago. Their coming was unheralded by any pomp and pageant whatever. No bursts of martial music greeted your ear, no thundering sound of canon, no brilliant staff, no glittering cortege dashed through the streets, instead came three long dirty columns, that kept on in an unceasing flow.
1 2