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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 874 98 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 411 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 353 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 353 235 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 345 53 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 321 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 282 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 253 1 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 242 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 198 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) or search for Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Flag Presentation to the Washington Artillery. (search)
for the field, knowing, alas! that many would never return. They did more; and the noble services they rendered in the hospitals, whether in camp, city or village, and the material assistance they gave to the troops at such cost to themselves, will ever deserve and obtain from the Confederate soldier, wherever he may be, and whatever may have been his fate, and from his children when he will have passed away, a most endeared remembrance and an unbounded gratitude. Two young ladies of Baltimore, of uncommon beauty and great intellectual attainments—Miss Hettie Carey and her sister, Miss Jennie Carey, had been compelled to leave their native State, Maryland, by reason of what was termed seditious sentiments and conduct; the plain meaning of which was their outspoken sympathy for the South. After being transferred across the lines, they made their temporary home in Richmond, with a near relative, Miss Constance Carey, formerly of Alexandria, Va., their equal, it appears, in every
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The story of the Arkansas. (search)
who, with the First Lieutenant, Henry K. Stevens, Afterward killed on board steamer Cotton, in Bayou Teche, La.stood on a platform entirely exposed to the enemy's fire. This was the signal for fresh girding up, last inspections and final arrangements for battle. Lieutenant John Grimball and myself divided the honor of commanding the eight-inch Columbiads. He fought the starboard and I the port gun. Midshipman Dabney M. Scales was his Lieutenant, and a youngster named John Wilson, of Baltimore, was mine. Lieutenant A. D. Wharton, of Nashville, came next on the starboard broadside, with Midshipman R. H. Bacot for his assistant. Lieutenant Charles W. Read, of Mississippi, had the two stern chasers, both rifles, to himself, and the remaining two guns on the port side were under command of Lieutenant Alphonse Barbot (recently died in New York). Each Lieutenant had two guns. Grimball and myself had each a bow-chaser and a broadside gun. The two Masters, John L. Phillips and Samuel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
itre through the blockade, and for producing it at home from caves. The amount of the latter delivered by contracts was considerable—chiefly in Tennessee. The consumption of lead was in part met by the Virginia lead mines (Wytheville), the yield from which was from 100,000 to 150,--000 pounds per month. A laboratory for the smelting of other ores, from the Silver Hill mines, North Carolina, and Jonesboro, East Tennessee, was put up at Petersburg, under the direction of Dr. Piggott, of Baltimore. It was very well constructed; was capable of smelting a good many thousand pounds per day, and was in operation before midsummer of 1862. Mines were opened on account of Government in East Tennessee, near the State line of Virginia. They were never valuable, and were soon abandoned. Lead was collected in considerable quantities throughout the country by the laborious exertions of agents employed for this purpose. The battle-field of Bull Run was fully gleaned, and much lead collecte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
itre through the blockade, and for producing it at home from caves. The amount of the latter delivered by contracts was considerable—chiefly in Tennessee. The consumption of lead was in part met by the Virginia lead mines (Wytheville), the yield from which was from 100,000 to 150,--000 pounds per month. A laboratory for the smelting of other ores, from the Silver Hill mines, North Carolina, and Jonesboro, East Tennessee, was put up at Petersburg, under the direction of Dr. Piggott, of Baltimore. It was very well constructed; was capable of smelting a good many thousand pounds per day, and was in operation before midsummer of 1862. Mines were opened on account of Government in East Tennessee, near the State line of Virginia. They were never valuable, and were soon abandoned. Lead was collected in considerable quantities throughout the country by the laborious exertions of agents employed for this purpose. The battle-field of Bull Run was fully gleaned, and much lead collecte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Within a Stone's throw of independence at Gettysburg. (search)
Within a Stone's throw of independence at Gettysburg. Our series of papers on Gettysburg—a summing up of which we may take an early opportunity of making—cannot be carefully studied by the unprejudiced student of history without an overwhelming conviction that if General Lee's orders had been properly carried out at Gettysburg, we would have won that field, crushed General Meade's army, rescued Maryland, captured Washington and Baltimore, and dictated terms of peace on Northern soil. General Lee himself said, with a good deal of feeling, in conversation with some gentlemen in Lexington, Va., not long before his death: If I had had Stonewall Jackson at Gettysburg I should have won there a great victory, and if we had reaped the fruits within our reach, we should have established the Independence of the Confederacy. We verily believe that the verdict of impartial History will be that the Confederates would have won Gettysburg, and Independence, but for the failure of one man
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
the account of the Baltimore riot (p. 277) fair, in view of the well-established facts that the troops fired first on the citizens, in response to their jeers and the throwing of several stones from the crowd, and that the attempt to make this Massachusetts regiment the representatives of the patriots who were fired on by British soldiers at Lexington in 1775, exactly reverses and falsifies the truth of history. These Massachusetts soldiers were the invaders, and the unarmed citizens of Baltimore (nine of whom were killed and a number wounded, while only two soldiers were killed and several wounded) were the patriotic defenders of their homes; the soldiers were the representatives of despotic power, and the citizens of patriots struggling for independence. 7. The statement (p. 278) that a majority of the people of West Virginia were attached to the Union is utterly untrue, in view of the fact that only 20,000 votes were cast against secession in the whole limits of old Virginia.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
matured, we will announce them; but we may say that in the meantime more money will be needed to carry out these plans, and contributions to the fund are still in order. the soldiers' home of the State of Louisiana has been fully organized, with General F. T. Nichols as President, and John H. Murray as Treasurer, and we have received the report for the year ending 1st of May, 1884, which gives a most encouraging exhibit of its affairs. They have twenty-two inmates of the Home, and seem to have made all proper arrangements for their care, and admirable regulations for the management of the Home. Colonel Heros von Borcke, the gallant and accomplished Prussian, who tendered his sword to the Confederacy and served with such distinction on the staff of General J. E. B. Stuart, is now on a visit to his old comrades, and has been received with open arms at Baltimore, Richmond, and at other points. Confederates generally will give him a warm welcome and a hearty greeting. Zzz
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
as orator of the evening, General Bradley T. Johnson, of Baltimore. General Johnson was greeted with hearty cheers, and was Blue Ridge, in order that, by threatening Washington and Baltimore, the enemy would be forced to withdraw from the south banmore and Ohio railroad, and on the National turnpike from Baltimore to Frederick. Robertson's brigade, under Munford, was pok movement down the north bank of the Potomac, to move on Baltimore, or to invade Pennsylvania, were questions which at that army in such order as continually to keep Washington and Baltimore covered, and at the same time to hold the troops well in f Frederick, but whether his intention was to move toward Baltimore or Pennsylvania was not then known. Lee's whole army hhave been. The army of McClellan would have been routed, Baltimore and Washington opened to the Confederates, and then—what? to the North, and with the possibility of the capture of Baltimore and Washington, the recognition of the Confederacy by the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
t with his own people, and we only await some additional proofs that have been promised us before publishing a full statement of the facts. But, in the meantime, it may be as well to put into our records the testimony of Senator Cameron, of Pennsylvania, in his speech in the United States Senate, on the bill for the relief of General Fitz. John Porter. Mr. Cameron, in the course of his defence of General Porter, said: It became my duty to take charge of the railroad from Harrisburg to Baltimore, and while so engaged an incident occurred in my office which impressed me greatly at the time, and which it has always seemed to me should atone to a great extent for any errors General Porter may have committed, if any, at a later period of the war. It was to a great extent through him, in my judgment, that the services of General George H. Thomas were secured to the side of the Union. General Thomas, then Major Thomas, was stationed at Carlisle Barracks. There were at the same time tw