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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Bangor (Maine, United States) or search for Bangor (Maine, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
and. The following letter from Dr. Hamlin (a nephew of ex-Vice President Hamlin) explains itself. Its frank, manly spirit, and the feelings which dictated it, will be appreciated and reciprocated by our Confederate soldiers and people: Bangor, Maine, December 8, 1882. General,—I am instructed by the Grand Army Post, No. 12, of this city, which numbers among its members about three hundred and fifty old soldiers, to invite you to deliver before them and the citizens of Bangor your lectBangor your lecture on the Battle of Chancellorsville, which we understand you are now delivering in Southern cities for the benefit of the Southern Historical Society. We shall be pleased to listen to your description of the battle, and we shall be prepared to accept its truth; for the deeds of valor performed on either side during the war have now become the property of the nation. Moreover, we might just as well admit them now as to leave them to posterity to admire. The invitation extended to you i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
and. The following letter from Dr. Hamlin (a nephew of ex-Vice President Hamlin) explains itself. Its frank, manly spirit, and the feelings which dictated it, will be appreciated and reciprocated by our Confederate soldiers and people: Bangor, Maine, December 8, 1882. General,—I am instructed by the Grand Army Post, No. 12, of this city, which numbers among its members about three hundred and fifty old soldiers, to invite you to deliver before them and the citizens of Bangor your lectBangor your lecture on the Battle of Chancellorsville, which we understand you are now delivering in Southern cities for the benefit of the Southern Historical Society. We shall be pleased to listen to your description of the battle, and we shall be prepared to accept its truth; for the deeds of valor performed on either side during the war have now become the property of the nation. Moreover, we might just as well admit them now as to leave them to posterity to admire. The invitation extended to you i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
nk into its merited oblivion. But as cumulative evidence of the utter falsity of the slander to which General Doubleday still adheres, we give the following statement of the Rev. Theodore Gerrish, (now pastor of the First Methodist Church, Bangor, Maine, but during the war a gallant soldier in the Twentieth Maine Regiment,) author of Reminiscences of the War. In a letter to the Secretary, dated March 16th, 1883, Mr. Gerrish says: One of my church members, a very reliable gentleman, whose address is W. H. Moore, Cumberland street, Bangor, was formerly a member of the Ninty-Seventh New York Regiment, which, at Gettysburg, was in Robinson's Division of the First Corps. He was wounded on the third day and taken to a hospital in the rear. General Armistead was brought to the same hospital and placed beside him. Brother Moore had never read the discussions of General Doubleday's statements about General Armistead at Gettysburg, but when I learned that he saw General A., I asked h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
g letter but for the pressure upon our pages: Fredericksburg, Va., July 31, 1883. Rev. J. William Jones: Dear Sir,—I was captured near Spotsylvania Courthouse, Va., May 19th, 1864, and carried to Point Lookout, where I remained until July 4, 1864, when I was transferred to Elmira, New York. While there I was employed in the prison hospital. Dr. E. F. Sanger, Surgeon in charge of the hospital, showed me great kindness, for which I have ever been grateful. During a recent visit to Bangor, Maine, I had the pleasure of meeting with the Doctor, and while conversing with him the subject of the mortality among the prisoners, both North and South, came up. I asked Dr. Sanger whether or not he had a record of the percentage of deaths at the hospital in Elmira. He told me that he had, and kindly allowed me to copy from his journal the following figures: Number of prisoners received at Elmira, from July, 1864, to May, 1865, 12,121; transferred, 4,273; released, 4,741; died, 2,933;