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Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 2, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.). You can also browse the collection for Beaufort (North Carolina, United States) or search for Beaufort (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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Sallust, Conspiracy of Catiline (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.), chapter 17 (search)
iii. 3. The family was originally from Gabii. Caius Cornelius ;Caius Cornelius) There were two branches of the gens Cornelia, one patrician, the other plebeian, from which sprung this conspirator. with many from the colonies and municipal towns,Municipal towns] Municipiis. The municipia were towns of which the inhabitants were admitted to the rights of Roman citizens, but which were allowed to govern themselves by their own laws, and to choose their own magistrates. See Aul. Gell., xvi. 13; Beaufort, Rep. Rom., vol. v." Bernouf. persons of consequence in their own localities. There were many others, too, among the nobility, concerned in the plot, but less openly; men whom the hope of power, rather than poverty or any other exigence, prompted to join in the affair. But most of the young men, and especially the sons of the nobility, favored the schemes of Catiline; they who had abundant means of living at ease, either splendidly or voluptuously, preferred uncertainties to certainties, w