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Doc. 42.-the Second Vermont regiment. The following is a list of the officers: Colonel — Henry Whiting, St. Clair, Mich.; Lieut.-Colonel--Geo. J. Stannard, St. Albans, Vt.; Major — Chas. H. Joyce, Northfield; Adjutant — Guilford S. Ladd, Bennington; Quartermaster — Perley P. Pitkin, Montpelier; Surgeon — Newton H. Ballou, Burlington; Assistant-Surgeon--Walter B. Carpenter, Burlington; Sergeant-Major--Wm. H. Guinan, Montpelier; Quartermaster's Sergeant — Wm. J. Cain, Rutland; Commissary-Sergeant — Lauriston H. Stone, Stowe; Chaplain--Rev. C. B. Smith, Brandon; Hospital Steward — Eli Z. Stearns, Burlington; Drum-Major--Chas. Remick, Hardwick. Company A, Bennington.--Jos. H. Walbridge, Captain; Newton Stone, First Lieutenant; William H. Cady, Second Lieutenant. Company B, Castleton.--James Hope, Captain; John Howe, First Lieutenant; Enoch E. Johnson, Second Lieutenant. Company C, Brattleboro.--Ed. A. Todd, Captain; J. S. Tyler, First Lieutenant; F. A. Prouty, Second Lie
sters, the unavoidable result of weakness, were ascribed to the incapacity or cowardice of the officers. Suggestions of treachery were even whispered, and the prejudices of the New Englanders against Schuyler — for even the North, at that time, was divided and distracted by bitter sectional prejudices, of which now, fortunately, hardly a trace remains — broke out with new violence. But all this disaster and confusion did not prevent, within two or three months after, the glorious days of Bennington and Bemis Heights, and the total capture of all Burgoyne's invading army. Not to dwell any further upon the disasters of the war of the Revolution, of which it would be easy to multiply instances, let us now cast a cursory glance at some of the occurrences of the war of 1812. Let us note, by the way, a curious circumstance with respect to that war — a circumstance eminently instructive as to the total change which has taken place of late years in the objects, ends, and aims of leadin<