Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) or search for Bowling Green (Kentucky, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
, acting with his accustomed promptitude of action, notified the President by letter on the 16th of the same month: I design, to-morrow, to take possession of Bowling Green with 5,000 troops. These troops were under command of General S. B. Buckner, who had at his instance been made Brigadier-General. General Zollikoffer was ordeion at the Cumberland Gap. General Leonidas Pork was already in command of the left wing of the army at Columbus, Ky. General Johnston made his headquarters at Bowling Green, the centre of his extended command, stretching from Cumberland Gap along the Barren river, to the Mississippi, on the left. General Johnston had an availabtended line for months, until the fall of Forts Donelson and Henry necessitated the removal of his army further south to protect the valley of the Mississippi. Bowling Green had to be evacuated and Nashville left unprotected— Nashville and the State of Tennessee. It was at this time that General Johnston was subjected to that whic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
, acting with his accustomed promptitude of action, notified the President by letter on the 16th of the same month: I design, to-morrow, to take possession of Bowling Green with 5,000 troops. These troops were under command of General S. B. Buckner, who had at his instance been made Brigadier-General. General Zollikoffer was ordeion at the Cumberland Gap. General Leonidas Pork was already in command of the left wing of the army at Columbus, Ky. General Johnston made his headquarters at Bowling Green, the centre of his extended command, stretching from Cumberland Gap along the Barren river, to the Mississippi, on the left. General Johnston had an availabtended line for months, until the fall of Forts Donelson and Henry necessitated the removal of his army further south to protect the valley of the Mississippi. Bowling Green had to be evacuated and Nashville left unprotected— Nashville and the State of Tennessee. It was at this time that General Johnston was subjected to that whic