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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 128 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 12 4 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 10 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 8 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Dedham (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Dedham (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
o a reaffirmation of his falsehoods on the platform of the Massachusetts Lib. 11.22, 23, 26. Anti-Slavery Society at its ninth annual meeting, where they had come up for emphatic condemnation. Edmund Quincy to J. A. Collins, in England. Dedham, Jan. 30, 1841. Ms. The annual meeting is just over, and went off in the best Lib. 11.22. possible manner. . . . The morning of the first day (Wednesday, 27th) was taken up by Garrison's report, This document, to be found in the regulae main trouble is the root of all evil, as he finds plenty of penniless adventurers and but few moneyed ones. Emerson thought of it but retired. Still, R. is sanguine, and I hope will succeed, for what a residence such a neighborhood would make Dedham! On January 30, 1841: Ripley is actually going to commence the New State and the New Church at Ellis's farm. . . . in the spring. Ms. Quincy to J. A. Collins. The idea of Brook Farm, as it was henceforth to be known, notoriously proceeded from
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
gh I am not very sanguine as to the result of this new species of colonization. Edmund Quincy to Richard D. Webb. Dedham, June 27 (–July 26), 1843. Ms. Garrison has been but in indifferent health since his dreadful illness in the winter. d his native habit of procrastination, and laid him open to friendly criticism: Edmund Quincy to W. L. Garrison. Dedham, November 6, 1843. Ms. I have sent in to you my concluding article on Leavitt, See the whole series of articles, dinvolving both parties in atrocious criminality—and should be immediately annulled. Edmund Quincy to R. D. Webb. Dedham, January 29, 1843. Ms. We dissolved the Union by a handsome vote, after a warm debate. This was on a resolution ofction of its mover to be Lib. 13.81. President of the Society for the ensuing year. Edmund Quincy to R. D. Webb. Dedham, June 27 (–July 26), 1843. Ms. I don't exactly remember when I wrote to you last, but am sure it was before the annua<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
full to worry along with it thus far. This will cripple him. His supplies will cease, and the paper stop. I regret it less than I should once, so far as I am concerned. It will be a relief to him, but cruelly furnished. I am sorry it comes from your hand. You could not intend it. But I cannot remark upon it. I only write to apprise you of my not returning to Concord. I am still very ill, but able to go out. Your affectionate friend, N. P. Rogers. Edmund Quincy to R. D. Webb. Dedham, Dec. 14, 1844. Ms. You will receive by this packet the public accounts of the sad business of the Herald of Freedom, and of the strange conduct of our friend Rogers. . . . We have watched this business from the beginning with deep interest and apprehension, but abstained from noticing it or in any wise interfering until it became absolutely unavoidable. There was an important antislavery instrumentality, of no great money value in the market, to be sure, but of inestimable value as a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
y, and resumes work with ardor. His new Sabbath Call is finely drawn up, I think. I did not sign it, though agreeing with its principles; mainly because I feel no such necessity for a specific movement against the Sabbath as he and H. C. W. do. The popular mind seems to me Henry C. Wright. clearing itself up fast enough for all practical purposes: these theological reforms have but a secondary interest for me. Quincy, too, was antipathetic. Edmund Quincy to R. D. Webb, in Dublin. Dedham, March 9, 1848. Ms. The letter to Patrick Keogh I did my best to get to him. But as no such person was to be found at the address, and after having been sent on fool's errands into various parts of the town by your finest pisantry on earth, I had to give it up, and was about consigning it to the all-swallowing, indiscriminate orifice of the common post, as the divine Charles Lamb says (whose name you blasphemously take in vain by Cf. Whittier's Prose Works, 2.216. mentioning it in the s