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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 237 77 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 148 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 19 19 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 4 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 7 1 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life. You can also browse the collection for Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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field, Pittsfield, Boxford, Readville, Worcester, Lowell, Long Island, and a few other places. The Three-months militia required no provision for their shelter, as they were ordered away soon after reporting for duty. Faneuil Hall furnished quarters for a part of them one night. The First Massachusetts Regiment of Infantry quartered for a week in Faneuil Hall; but, this not being a suitable place for so large a body of men to remain, on the first day of June the regiment marched out to Cambridge, and took possession of an old ice-house on the borders of Fresh Pond, which had been procured by the State authorities and partially fitted up for barracks, and Readville (Mass.) Barracks.: from a Photograph. established their first camp. But this was not the first camp established in the State, for three years troops had already been ordered into camp on Long Island and at Fort Warren. Owing to the unhealthiness of the location selected for the First Regiment, their stay in it was
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life, X. Raw recruits. (search)
father of the resolution I had taken. Instead of interposing an emphatic objection, as he had done the previous year, he said, in substance, Well, you know I do not want you to go, but it is very evident that a great many more must go, and if you have fully determined upon it I shall not object. Having already determined upon the arm of the service which I should enter, accompanied by three other acquaintances of the same opinion, two of them the school-fellows mentioned, I started for Cambridge, with a view of seeing Captain Porter, who was then at home recruiting for the First Massachusetts Battery, which he commanded, and enlisting with him, as there were at least two men in his company who were fellow-townsmen. But we were much disappointed when the Captain informed us that his company was now recruited to the number required. However, we directed our steps back to Boston without delay, and there, in the second story of the Old State House, enlisted in a new organization the
s, there were flags in the army which talked for the soldiers, and I cannot furnish a more entertaining chapter than one which will describe how they did it, when they did it, and what they did it for. True, of the flags used in the service told stories of their own. What more eloquent than Old glory, with its thirteen stripes, reminding us of our small beginning as a nation, its blue field, originally occupied by the cross of the English flag when Washington first gave it to the breeze in Cambridge, but replaced later by a cluster of stars, which keep a tally of the number of States in the Union! What wealth of history its subsequent career as the national emblem suggests, making it almost vocal with speech! The corps, division, and brigade flags, too, told a little story of their own, in a manner already described. But there were other flags, whose sole business it was to talk to one another, and the stories they told were immediately written down for the benefit of the soldiers
Borden's Milk, 125 Boston, 25,29-30,51, 199,226 Bounty-jumpers, 161-62,202 Bowditch, Henry I., 315 Boxford, Mass., 44 Boydton Plank Road, 313 Bragg, Braxton, 262 Brandy Station, Va., 113, 180,229, 352-53 Bristoe Station, Va., 367 Brown, Joseph W., 403 Buchanan, James, 18-19,395 Buell, Don Carlos, 405 Bugle calls, 165-66, 168-69, 172, 176-78,180-97,336-38 Burgess' Tavern, Va., 313 Burnside, Ambrose E., 71-72,100, 260-61 Butterfield, Daniel, 257 Cambridge, Mass., 45,199,394 Camp Andrew, 44 Camp Barry, 189 Camp Cameron, 44-45 Canton, Mass., 270 Carr, J. B., 347 Carrington, Henry B., 160-61 Centreville Heights, Va., 367 Century Magazine, 407-8 Chancellorsville, 71, 331,349,388 Chattanooga, 262,270,362,403 Chicago, 135 City Point, Va., 115, 121,320,350-51 Clemens, Samuel, 106 Cold Harbor, 238 Committee on Military Affairs, 315 Confederate States Army. Armies: Army of Northern Virginia, 235, 406-7; State Tr