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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 237 77 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 148 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 19 19 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 10 4 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 7 7 Browse Search
John D. Billings, Hardtack and Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life 7 1 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations. You can also browse the collection for Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Cambridge (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations, To James Russell Lowell, school-mate and fellow townsman, this book is inscribed. (search)
To James Russell Lowell, school-mate and fellow townsman, this book is inscribed. Alter ab undecimo tum me jam ceperat annus, Jam fragiles poteram a terra contingere ramos. Ver erat aeternum; placidique tepentibus auris Mulcebant zephyri natos sine semine flores. Cambridge, Mass., U. S. A., 1889.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations, Prologue. (search)
Prologue. [Recited by a young lady at the first performance of the Vassall House Dramatic Club, Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 8, 1882.] Beneath this roof the stately Vassall race Once swept these halls in velvet and point-lace, Sedately welcomed many an English lord, And met him with the snuff-box, not the sword. A hundred years are passed. We fill the scene With humbler graces, less chivalric mien. Yet you may see upon our mimic stage The show and semblance of that earlier age; The old brocades may veil some modern form Of living beauty and of heart still warm; And we, the youths and maidens of to-day, Will be your vassals if you'll like our play.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations, Waiting for the bugle. (search)
Waiting for the bugle. [Read before the Grand Army Post (56) of veteran soldiers, at Cambridge, Mass., May 25, 1888.] We wait for the bugle; the night-dews are cold, The limbs of the soldiers feel jaded and old, The field of our bivouac is windy and bare, There is lead in our joints, there is frost in our hair, The future is veiled and its fortunes unknown, As we lie with hushed breath till the bugle is blown. At the sound of that bugle each comrade shall spring Like an arrow released from the strain of the string; The courage, the impulse of youth shall come back To banish the chill of the drear bivouac, And sorrows and losses and cares fade away When that life-giving signal proclaims the new day. Though the bivouac of age may put ice in our veins, And no fibre of steel in our sinew remains; Though the comrades of yesterday's march are not here, And the sunlight seems pale and the branches are sere,-- Though the sound of our cheering dies down to a moan, We shall find our lost