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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 133 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 59 23 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 44 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 31 7 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 26 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 24 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 14 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 31 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Follen, 1842- (search)
Adams, Charles Follen, 1842- Humorous writer; born in Dorchester, Mass., April 21, 1842; received a common-school education; and was wounded and taken prisoner at Gettysburg while serving in the Union army. Since 1872 he has become widely known by his humorous poems in German dialect, of which Leedle Yawcob Strauss and other poems and Dialect ballads are the most popular.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
ghs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 8 ; Winchester, with the Suburbs and Liberties thereof, 1; Southampton Town and the County thereof, 1. Dorsetshire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except Dorchester, 7; Dorchester, 1. Devonshire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder particularly named, 12; Exeter, 2; Plymouth, 2; Barnstaple, 1. Cornwall, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein. 8. SomDorchester, 1. Devonshire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder particularly named, 12; Exeter, 2; Plymouth, 2; Barnstaple, 1. Cornwall, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein. 8. Somersetshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 8; Bristol, 3; Taunton-Dean. 1. Wiltshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Salisbury, 7 ; Salisbury, 1. Berkshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Reading, 5; Reading. 1. Surrey. with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Southwark, 5; Southwark, 2. Middlesex, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereun
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anglican Church. (search)
Plymouth was really in a formative state yet. All of the congregation were not prepared to lay aside the liturgy of the Church of England, and two of them (John and Samuel Browne) protested, and set up a separate worship. The energetic Endicott promptly arrested the malcontents and sent them to England. Following up the system adopted at Salem, the emigrants, under the charter of 1630, established Nonconformist churches wherever settlements were planted — Charlestown, Watertown, Boston, Dorchester, etc. At Salem the choice of minister and teacher was made as follows: Every fit member wrote in a note the name whom the Lord moved him to think was fit for pastor, and so likewise for teacher. Skelton was chosen for the first office. Higginson for the second. When they accepted, three or four of the gravest members of the church laid their hands upon Mr. Skelton and Mr. Higginson, using prayer therewith. Such was the first New England ordination. See Protestant Episcopal Church Refo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boston, (search)
Not so. When the act was received at Boston, its committee of correspondence invited eight of the neighboring towns to a conference on the critical state of public affairs. At three o'clock on the afternoon of May 12, 1774, the committees of Dorchester. Roxbury, Brookline, Newtown. Cambridge, Charlestown, Lynn, and Lexington joined them in Faneuil Hall. Samuel Adams was chosen chairman. They denounced the Boston Port act as cruel and unjust, by accusing, trying, and condemning the town ofngth of the besiegers. Heavy cannon were placed in battery before Boston. Secretly Dorchester Heights was occupied by the Americans, and fortified in a single night. Howe saw. for the first time, that he was in real danger, for the cannon at Dorchester commanded the town. First he tried to dislodge the provincials. He failed. A council of war determined that the only method of securing safety for the British army was to fly to the ocean. He offered to evacuate the town and harbor if Washi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cape Ann (search)
iginal name of the present city of Gloucester, Mass., noted for more than 250 years for its extensive fishery interests. It was chosen as a place of settlement for a fishing colony by Rev. John White (a long time rector of Trinity Church, Dorchester, England) and several other influential persons. Through the exertions of Mr. White, a joint-stock association was formed, called the Dorchester adventurers, with a capital of about $14,000. Cape Anne was purchased, and fourteen persons, with liveDorchester adventurers, with a capital of about $14,000. Cape Anne was purchased, and fourteen persons, with live-stock, were sent out in 1623, who built a house and made preparations for curing fish. Affairs were not prosperous there. Roger Conant was chosen governor in 1625, but the Adventurers became discouraged and concluded on dissolving the colony. Through the encouragement of Mr. White, some of the colonists remained, but, not liking their seat, they went to Naumkeag, now Salem, where a permanent colony was settled. Population in 1890, 24,651; in 1900, 26,121.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Channing, Edward 1856- (search)
Channing, Edward 1856- Historian; born in Dorchester, Mass., June 15, 1856; was graduated at Harvard College in 1878; and became Professor of History there. His publications include The United States, 1765-1865; A student's history of the United States; Town and county government in. The English colonies of North America; Narraganset planters; Companions of Columbus, in Justin Winsor's Narrative and critical history of America; Guide to study of American history (with Albert B. Hart); and English history for Americans (with Thomas W. Higginson).
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clap, Roger 1609-1691 (search)
Clap, Roger 1609-1691 Pioneer; born in Salcomb, England, April, 1609; settled in Dorchester, Mass., with Maverick and others in 1630; was representative of the town in 1652-66, and also held a number of military and civil offices. In 1665-86 he was captain of Castle William. He wrote a memorial of the New England worthies, and other Memoirs, which were first published in 1731 by Rev. Thomas Prince, and later republished by the Historical Society of Dorchester. He died in Boston, Mass., Feb. 2, 1691.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Codman, John 1814- (search)
Codman, John 1814- Author; born in Dorchester, Mass., Oct. 16, 1814; educated at Amherst College; followed the sea in 1834-64, and in the Civil War was captain of the Quaker City, which carried provisions to Port Royal. His publications relating to the United States include Restoration of the American carrying trade; and the Mormon country. He died in Boston, Mass., April 6, 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Endicott, John, 1589- (search)
Endicott, John, 1589- Colonial governor; born in Dorchester, England, in 1589; was John Endicott. sent by the Massachusetts Company to superintend the plantation at Naumkeag; arrived there Sept. 6 (N. S.), and in April next year was appointed governor of the colony, but was succeeded by John Winthrop. In 1636 he was sent with Captain Underhill, with about ninety men, on an expedition against Indians on Block Island and the Pequods. Mr. Endicott was deputy-governor of Massachusetts several years, and also governor, in which office he died, March 15, 1665. Bold, energetic, sincere, and bigoted, he was the strongest of the Puritans, and was severe in the execution of laws against those who differed from the prevailing theology of the colony. He was one of the most persistent persecutors of the Quakers, and stood by unmoved, as governor, when they were hanged in Boston; and so violent were his feelings against the Roman Catholics, and anything that savored of popery, that he c
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 (search)
Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 Statesman; born in Dorchester, Mass., April 11, 1794; brother of the preceding; graduated at Harvard in 1811; and was ordained pastor of the Brattle Street (Boston) Unitarian Church in February, 1814. He was chosen Professor of Greek in Harvard University in 1815, and took the chair on his return from Europe in 1819. Mr. Everett was in Congress from 1825 to 1835; governor of Massachusetts from 1836 to 1840; minister to England from 1841 to 1845; president of Harvard from 1846 to 1849; and succeeded Daniel Webster as Secretary of State in November, 1852. He was in the United States Senate from March, 1853, until May, 1854, when he retired to private life on account of feeble health. He took great interest in the efforts of the women of the United States to raise money to purchase Mount Vernon. He wrote and spoke much, and by his efforts procured a large amount of money, and the estate was purchased. He was nominated for the Vice-Presidency of the U
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