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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 133 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 59 23 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 44 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 38 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 31 7 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 26 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 24 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 22 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 20.. You can also browse the collection for Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) or search for Dorchester, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) in all documents.

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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 20., Notes Epistolary and Horticultural. (search)
t side of the Barn, one in the alley near the grape vine. The others were pear trees. The Beurre Colmars were planted on the east side of the garden and the Bon Chretiens on the north. The Bon Chretien is the pear now found in all American gardens called Bartlett. It was originated in England, propagated by a London grower by the name of Williams, and sent out by him. Its original name was lost soon after imported here in 1799. It was propagated and disseminated by Enoch Bartlett of Dorchester. When the trees fruited they were supposed to be seedlings and were given the grower's name, Bartlett. Mr. Manning of Salem, an eminent authority, felt that the fruit was identical with an English variety, and the statement he made at that time to that effect he was afterwards able to prove, but it was too late to restore the original name. Till 1830 all trees that had been propagated were from scions in Bartlett's garden, but after that time they were largely imported. In the earl