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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
the Union, Geo. D. Prentice,17 30.The Seventh, Fitz-James O'Brien,17 31.The United States Flag, W. Ross Wallace,18 32.National Guard Marching Song, A. J. H. Duganne,19 33.Songs of the Rebels: War Song,19 34.Songs of the Rebels: On Fort Sumter,19 35.A New-Song of Sixpence, Vanity Fair,23 36.The Great Bell Roland, Theo. Tilton,29 37.The Sentinel of the 71st, J. B. Bacon,29 38.Work to Do, R. H. Stoddard,29 39. All we Ask is to be let alone, Hartford Courant,30 40.Original Ode, Charleston, S. C., July 4,30 41.The New Birth, W. W. Howe,31 42.An Appeal for the Country, Ellen Key Blunt,31 43. Liberty and Union, one and Inseparable, F. A. H., 31 44.The 19th of April, 1861, Lucy Larcom, 32 45.Through Baltimore, Bayard Taylor,32 46.Under the Washington Elm, Oliver Wendell Holmes,33 47.Sumter,33 48.The Two Eras, L. H. Sigourney,34 49.The Sixth at Baltimore, B. P. Shillaber,34 50.Col. Corcoran's Brigade, Enul, 34 51.April 19, 1775-1861, H. H. B., 35 52.All Hail to the Star
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Introduction. (search)
sented to and ratified the Constitution of the United States, in order, among other objects, to secure the blessings of liberty for themselves and their posterity, can no more be repealed in 1861, than any other historical fact that occurred in Charleston in that year and on that day. It would be just as rational, at the present day, to attempt by ordinance to repeal any other event, as that the sun rose or that the tide ebbed and flowed on that day, as to repeal by ordinance the assent of Carolm Baltimore. It implored the new Government to lay a protecting duty on all articles imported from abroad, which can be manufactured at home. The second was from the shipwrights, not of New York, not of Boston, not of Portland, but of Charleston, South Carolina, praying for such a general regulation of trade and the establishment of such A Navigation Act, as will relieve the particular distresses of the petitioners, in common with those of their fellow-ship-wrights throughout the Union ! and i