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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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f hostilities, the poems on the Southern side were much more intense and inspired than those produced in the North. Only the fear of dissolution aroused in all its strength the latent devotion to the central Government. Only then throughout the North— They closed the ledger and they stilled the loom, The plough left rusting in the prairie farm; They saw but ‘Union’ in the gathering gloom; The tearless women helped the men to arm. Henry Timrod in 1865 Henry Timrod, born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1829, devoted himself during all his brief life to the service of his native city and State. During his early education in the Charleston schools his love of poetry was already apparent. After leaving the University of Georgia, on account of ill-health and lack of means, he studied law for a time in Charleston. His poetic convictions led him to withdraw from the profession and accept a position as private tutor. Among the literary men of the city he soon became known as one<
rginia, publishers of the memorial edition of the Poems of Henry Timrod. Henry Timrod. Probably the most ardent of Southern poets, Henry Timrod, here writes in lofty calm of his native city awaiting the attack of Admiral Samuel F. Dupont on April 7, 1863. the poem forms an interesting contrast with the preceding, written two years previously. Calm as that second summer which precedes The first fall of the snow, In the broad sunlight of heroic deeds, The city bides the foe. Charleston, Sc. The picture of Confederate artillerymen sighting a field-piece in the outskirts of Charleston shows that there were active preparations for the expected attack. The city had, indeed, been put in a thorough state of defense by General Beauregard, who had assumed command on September 15, 1862. The forts at the entrance to the harbor were strengthened or partly rebuilt, and the waters sown with torpedoes and obstructions. The poet therefore had good reason for awaiting so calmly the na
86; the cemetery at City Point 3,719 known dead, 1,439 unknown—a total of 5,158; the one at Alexandria 3,401 known dead, 123 unknown—a total of 3,524. But these lack much of being the largest. At Vicksburg, 16,615 lie buried; at Nashville, 16,533; at Arlington, Virginia, 16,254; and Fredericksburg, Virginia, 15,273, of whom 12,785 are unknown. Military Cemetery Cemetery at soldiers' home, Washington Soldiers, graves at City Point, Virginia Graves of Federal soldiers, Charleston, S. C. In the soldiers' cemetery at Alexandria A sweeping view of the Alexandria heroic dead Ode for decoration day One of the earliest poems of its class, this selection from Peterson's ode manifests a spirit as admirable as it is now general. O gallant brothers of the generous South, Foes for a day and brothers for all time! I charge you by the memories of our youth, By Yorktown's field and Montezuma's clime, Hold our dead sacred—let them quietly rest In your unnumbered vales,<
itness, in its white peace and prosperity, to the indissoluble union of American States and the imperishable brotherhood of the American people. Now, what answer has New England to this message? Will she permit the prejudice of war to remain in the hearts of the conquerors, when it has died in the hearts of the conquered? Will she transmit this prejudice to the next generation, that in their hearts, which never felt the generous ardor of conflict, it The Pinckney house in Charleston, South Carolina Here lived from 1769 the noted Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, after his return from school at Westminster and Oxford. When the Revolution began he discontinued his practice of law and led a provincial regiment. For two years he was one of Washingon's aidesde-camp. In 1780 his wife was evicted from the mansion by British troops when Sir Henry Clinton and Lord Cornwallis occupied the town. The history of his dwelling-place terminated in December, 1861. A fire began on a wharf b