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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
commissioners were appointed in each county to look after the needy, and in this way the State became, for the time, a great almoner. Commissioners were appointed, whose sole duty was to provide salt, and the chief of the bureau for making salt, saltpeter, copperas, sulphur, sulphuric acids, and medical extracts, was Prof. W. C. Kerr, class of 1850. As early as 1862 he had been chemist and superintendent to the Mecklenburg Salt Company, whose works were located at Mt. Pleasant, near Charleston, S. C. He had made such improvements in the manufacture that the cost for wood was reduced one-half and other expenses lessened. The University takes an honorable place also in the manufacture of iron, for the second largest iron-mill in the Confederacy was owned and controlled by Robert R. and John L. Bridgers, both alumni, the former being also a member of the Confederate Congress. There was danger of an iron famine in the Confederacy, and at the request of the government the Messrs. Br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First gun at Sumter. (search)
e would not be allowed to receive provisions from the United States authorities. The Major declined to accede to this arrangement, saying he would not open fire unless a hostile act was committed against his fort or his flag, but that if he could be supplied with provisions before the 15th of April he would receive them, and in that event he would not surrender. This reply being unsatisfactory, Colonel James Chestnut and Captain S. D. Lee gave the Major a written communication, dated Fort Sumter, S. C., April 12, 1861, 3:20 A. M., informing him, by authority of General Beauregard, that the batteries of General Beauregard would open fire on the fort in one hour from that time. The party, as designated, then proceeded in their boats to Fort Johnson, on James Island, and delivered the order to Captain George S. James, commanding the mortar battery, to open fire on Fort Sumter. At 4:30 A. M. the first gun was fired at Fort Sumter, and at 4:40 the second gun was fired from the same ba
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
Running the blockade. [from the Richmond times Feb. 21, 1897.] daring Exploits at Charleston in war times. Some lucky vessels that made their way through the Federal Fleets repeatedly without Detection. Charleston, S. C., February 6, 1897. The blockade of this harbor and the naval manoeuvres off Charleston bar next week, have brought out some interesting reminiscences of the genuine blockade of the sixties. There are numbers of men surviving, who ran the blockade through the United States fleet, but most of the masters of the vessels are dead. Among those still to be seen in Charleston are Captains Sim Adkins, A. O. Stone, William F. Adair, F. N. Bonneau, and Edward Morse. Captain H. S. Lebby, one of the most daring of Charleston's blockade runners, is now in the Sailors' Snug Harbor. In most instances the vessels were of English build, small, fast, with powerful engines, and of the type known as Clyde steamers. Their color assimilated that of the clouds, or
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.48 (search)
lotte, N. C , observer. April 21, 1895.] its history by Major Graham Daves. Its organization, with accurate Rosters. Field and line Officers—J. Johnston Pettigrew its first Colonel—The Regiment rendered splendid service to the State from the beginning to the bitter end. The 22d Regiment of North Carolina Troops was organized in camp near Raleigh in July, 1861, by the election of the following field officers: Colonel, J. Johnston Pettigrew, of Tyrrell county, then a resident of Charleston, S. C. Colonel Pettigrew had seen service with the forces in South Carolina, and commanded a regiment at the siege and capture of Fort Sumter by the Confederates in April, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel, John O. Long, of Randolph county, a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point; Major, Thomas S. Gallaway, Jr., of Rockingham county, a graduate of the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, Va. The commissions of the field officers all bore date of July 11th, 1861. The regi