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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 898 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 893 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 560 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 559 93 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 470 8 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 439 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 410 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 311 309 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 289 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 278 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
eek in face of an enemy in our front three times our number; relieved many of the inhabitants of their durance vile; saved much property, and avenged somewhat the outrages which had followed Shingler's raid, and returned to Chaffin's to meet the thanks of the War Department and of General Elzey. Tabb and Page and Captain Rives, with a section of artillery, especially met my commendation. After this, in September, 1863, this brigade was ordered to report to General Beauregard at Charleston, South Carolina. Whilst at Chaffin's Bluff, its men and officers began to chafe somewhat that they were not put into a service where more laurels and less hard service could be gained. But there was one officer who nobly said: I am ready to do my whole duty wherever I am put, and if my superiors in command see fit to give me the least glorious duty to perform, I will do it with the same alacrity that I would or could perform those duties which are crowned with the brightest leaves of honor; and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
er, you find him engaged upon some principle of finance, and its application to practical business. The life of Mr. Petigru comes up to these demands, fulfills all these requirements, and has woven around it an interest far above the average. He was admitted to be the foremost lawyer of South Carolina by his profession and the public generally. If I were to say that he was the foremost lawyer of the South, I do not believe the statement would be challenged. As a practitioner in Charleston, South Carolina, as Solicitor of his circuit, and as Attorney General of his State, he fairly earned and richly deserved the designation, a great lawyer. Mr. Petigru was born in a fortunate period in his country's history. He first saw the light in May, 1789. At that time, the foremost minds of America were studying constitutional questions, and the underlying principles of government. No wonder that this bright young Carolina lawyer should have become interested in affairs of State, formed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
Career of the Shenandoah. [from the Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., February 3, 1895.] the terror of the Arctic seas captured Thirty-eight whalers, and destroyed Shipping valued at nearly $7,000,000. A graphic account of the Cruise of the great commerce Destroyer, from the time of her fitting out near Funchal, Madeira, October, 1864, to her surrender to the British at Liverpool, November, 1865. By Lieutenant John Grimball, C. S. Navy. With a summary afforded by the naval records office at Washington. On the 6th October, 1864, the Confederate steamer Florida was captured at Bahia, a neutral port, in violation of an agreement which, to all intents and purposes, amounted to a flag of truce. This loss of the Florida, not known to us for weeks after, left the Confederacy without a cruiser afloat; but on the 7th, the very next day, the Sea King sailed from London to assume her place on the high seas, as the Confederate steamer Shenandoah, with instructions to visit the whali
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Signal service Corps. [Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., May 2, 1897.] (search)
The Signal service Corps. [Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., May 2, 1897.] A Tribute to their arduous and invaluable services during the war. An address by A. W. Taft, before Camp Sumter C. V., Charleston, S. C., May 1, 1897. Commander and Comrades: To-night you have invited me to respond in behalf of the Signal Corps, being the senior officer of that body connected with your camp. With great pleasure do I accept the compliment, for it cannot but be a matter of pride to be chosenCharleston, S. C., May 1, 1897. Commander and Comrades: To-night you have invited me to respond in behalf of the Signal Corps, being the senior officer of that body connected with your camp. With great pleasure do I accept the compliment, for it cannot but be a matter of pride to be chosen as the representative of such a command, a body composed of men selected from the different branches of the service, not only for their intelligence, but also for the complete confidence that could be placed in them, holding only the humble rank of privates, but what greater compliment can be paid to any man than to say of him that he had been selected for his intelligence and reliability from the ranks of the Confederate army, whose merits have won the admiration of all nations? I can also
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
The Slaughter at Petersburg, June 18, 1864. [from the Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., July 25, 1897.] There was no fighting around Petersburg in 1863. Some interesting personal reminiscences of the fatal day, and those which immediately preceded and succeeded it, by Judge Wm. M. Thomas, then an officer of Rion's Battalion in Hagood's Brigade. To the Editor of the Sunday News. In your issue of Sunday, the 18th July, Mr. Marcus B. Alley, of the Maine Artillery during the late war between the States, gives a history of the Federal attack upon the lines at Petersburg on June 18, 1864. He writes it as 1863, but that was a mistake. There was no fighting around Petersburg in 1863, and all with whom I have conversed agree that 1864 is correct. Otherwise his description from the Federal standpoint is in accord with my recollection. As this was a bloody and remarkable battle, and no account of it has been written for several years, you will, I hope, allow me to give
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
Boy heroes of Cold Harbor. [from the Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., July 25, 1897.1 How Taylor, Hayne, Pinckney and Gadsden Holmes died. Colonel Edward McCrady, after Consultation with Captains Armstrong, Kelly, Hasell, Hutson and Dr. Frost, tells the story of the Heroism of the four Young South Carolinians who fell at Cold Harbor supporting the colors of the 1st regiment, S. C. V.—The gallant Dominick Spellman, of the Irish Volunteers. The following interesting letter of Colonel Edward McCrady to Mrs. Thomas Taylor, of Columbia, explains itself: Charleston, April 6, 1897. My Dear Mrs. Taylor: It will make rather a long letter to answer your inquiries of the 25th ultimo. I will, however, endeavor to do so as briefly as I can. I should premise that, though present at the battle of Cold Harbor on the June 27, 1862, I was not on duty with the regiment, the 1st South Carolina Volunteers, of which I was then major. I had been ill in Richmond for some weeks when th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
10th Infantry, Luray, Page county. This second lieutenant was the late Speaker of the House of Representatives. Among others of the 600 not named with the Virginians, but well-known in Richmond, were Captain Thomas Pinckney, 4th cavalry, Charleston, S. C., and Colonel A. Fulkerson, 63rd Tennessee Infantry, Rogersville. The only Richmond man in the lot was Second Lieutenant S. H. Hawes, Page's Virginia Battery. The story of the transportation and life of the 600 is told by Captain F. C. Bin this profession. The narrative written by Captain Frayser follows: In August, 1864, orders were issued by the Federal Government that 600 Confederate officers confined at Fort Delaware should should be sent to Morris Island, near Charleston, S. C., and placed under fire. There had been sent previously fifty general and field officers to the same point for the same purpose.— But after some little delay these officers were exchanged. The 600 were somewhat elated at first, thinking th