hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 255 53 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 178 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 96 96 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 81 27 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 66 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 47 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 44 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 36 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 34 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) or search for Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 7 document sections:

ing their seats at Charleston, they went to Baltimore for the mere purpose of more effectually completing the work of destruction by drawing off another detachment? I, sir, entertain no doubt that the secession was the result most desired by the disunionists; that the object of the new issue then gotten up was merely to form a pretext for secession, and its adoption was the last thing they desired or designed. Glance a moment at a few facts: Alabama, led by an open disunionist, went to Cincinnati, in 1856, under instructions to secede unless the equal rights of all States and Territories should be conceded and incorporated into the platform of the democratic party. The concession was made and they had no opportunity to secede. They came to Charleston under the same leader, again instructed to secede unless the convention would put into the platform a new plank, the effect of which, if adopted, would be further to disgust and alienate the Northern democracy. In this instance th
Doc. 21.-Senator Johnson's speech, at Cincinnati, Ohio, June 19. Fellow-citizens:--In reply to the cordial welcome which has just been tendered to me, through your chosen organ — in reply to what has been said by the gentleman chosen by you to bid me welcome to Cincinnati — I have not language adequate to express my feelings of gratitude. I cannot find language to thank you for the tender of good fellowship which has been made to me on the present occasion. I came here without any expectCincinnati — I have not language adequate to express my feelings of gratitude. I cannot find language to thank you for the tender of good fellowship which has been made to me on the present occasion. I came here without any expectation that such a reception was in store for me. I had no expectation of being received and welcomed in the language, I may say the eloquent and forcible language of your chosen organ. I am deserving of no such tender. I might conclude what little I am going to say by merely responding to, and endorsing every single sentence uttered on this occasion in welcoming me in your midst. (Applause.) For myself, I feel that while I am a citizen of a Southern State--a citizen of the South and of t<
Doc. 30.-the position of Kentucky. General Buckner to Governor Magoffin. Headquarters Ky. State Guards, Louisville, June 10, 1861. sir:--On the 8th instant, at Cincinnati, Ohio, I entered into an arrangement with Major-General G. B. McClellan, commander of the United States troops in the State north of the Ohio River, to the following effect: The authorities of the State of Kentucky are to protect the United States property within the limits of the State, to enforce the laws of the United States, in accordance with the interpretations of the United States courts, as far as those laws may be applicable to Kentucky, and to enforce, with all the power of the State, our obligations of neutrality as against the Southern States, as long as the position we have assumed shall be respected by the United States. Gen. McClellan stipulates that the territory of Kentucky shall be respected on the part of the United States, even though the Southern States should occupy it; but i
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 71.-fight at Middle-Fork Bridge, Va., July 6, 1861. (search)
in the right foot by a rebel from the hill-side. The ball struck on the top of his ankle, and passed downwards, shattering the small bones of the foot. The surgeons hope to save the foot, but it is doubtful. High was in the front of the battle, and fell exclaiming: Captain, I'm hit, but I must have another shot; raising and standing on one foot he loaded and fired twice more, when, being faint, two of his comrades assisted him into the bushes. Nicholas Black, a Brighton butcher boy, of Cincinnati, was struck in the forehead, over the right eye, by a buckshot, which lodged between the skull bones — a severe wound, but not dangerous. He fell, and rising again, he took two more shots at the enemy. Geo. W. Darling, of Newark, was shot in the left arm; the ball entered at the elbow, and traversed the muscles of the arm seven or eight inches, ploughing up a ghastly furrow; the bone was not broken. David Edson, of Barnesville, Belmont County, slightly wounded in the right arm. Joseph B
nion on the 9th of July. It was impossible at that time to travel on either of the direct routes, and he went to Bristol, Tennessee, where he was arrested and lodged in jail overnight, but released the next morning, after an examination by the military authorities. He then proceeded to Nashville, Tennessee, where a similar fate awaited him; but, after some difficulty, he also obtained his release there, and, proceeding direct to Louisville, met no further obstructions on his journey, via Cincinnati, Pittsburg, Harrisburg, and Lancaster, to Philadelphia. Among the causes which hastened his departure from Richmond was the general belief there that every citizen capable of bearing arms would soon be impressed into the military service, and the alternative was presented to him of soon being subjected to great indignities, bearing arms against the North, or escaping. Some of the intelligence he communicated to us was of a very important character, and it was all full of interest. H
ual or probable policy and designs of its commanding officers. It could not but have been apparent to every man of military capacity that the war could not be carried on in the face of this minute and persistent espionage; that it was the occasion of perpetual loss and danger; that, in fact, it was placing not only each column, but the cause of the Government in daily jeopardy. What have the rebels wanted of spies, when they could find daily in the columns of a New York, Philadelphia, or Cincinnati newspaper more reliable intelligence of the very things they wanted to know than hundreds of spies could collect and transmit? Yet these things have been tolerated; nay, they have been encouraged. Every officer from Commanding General to Corporal, has seemed to think it desirable to have the correspondent of a newspaper at his elbow, to sing his praises, put him right with the public, and be the convenient vehicle to transmit to the world a knowledge of his exploits. The very Commande
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 199.-skirmish at Hawk's Nest, Va., August 20, 1861. (search)
Doc. 199.-skirmish at Hawk's Nest, Va., August 20, 1861. A correspondent of the Richmond Enquirer states the following in reference to this affair: Gentlemen: In your issue of to-day I note the subjoined Yankee telegraphic despatch:-- Cincinnati, August 22, 1861. A skirmish occurred at Hawk's Nest, in the Kanawha Valley, eight miles beyond, on the 20th. The Confederates, some four thousand strong, advanced to where the Eleventh Ohio regiment had erected barricades, and were driven back with a loss of fifty killed and a number wounded and taken prisoners. Our loss was only two slightly wounded and one missing. Our forces captured quite a number of horses and equipments. I have just returned from General Wise's command, having left there on the night of the 20th, and after the skirmish was over. Our forces consisted of parts of three cavalry companies, amounting to about one hundred men, and the enemy numbered at least six hundred. Colonel Croghan, of our briga